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Demonstrators gather in front of the Interior Ministry during a protest against Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

Tunisian Protests Enter Fourth Consecutive Day

Protesters in Tunisia have been holding anti-government demonstrations for the past four days against the worsening socio-economic crisis in the country.

Protests in Tunisia have entered their fourth consecutive day. Hundreds of Tunisians are leading protests across various regions of the country in response to the worsening economic and social crisis. The army has since been called in since the protests began and at least 630 arrests have reportedly been made including that of human rights activist, Hamza Nassri Jeridi. International human rights body Amnesty International has called for Jeridi's release in addition to condemning footage of army officials using excessive force.

READ: Tunisian President Calls for Death Penalty Following Murder of Young Woman

Amna Guellali, Amnesty International's Deputy Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa, released the following statement:

"Even when acts of vandalism and looting occur, law enforcement officers must only use force where absolutely necessary and proportionate. Nothing gives security forces permission to deploy unnecessary and excessive force including when they are responding to acts of sporadic violence." said , Amnesty International's Deputy Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa."

Al Jazeera reports that President Kais Saied visited Ariana, which is a city near the capital city of Tunis, and implored protesters saying, "I know the state of poverty and I also know who is exploiting your poverty," and going on to add, "Don't let anyone exploit your misery." Hundreds of youths clashed with law enforcement authorities this past Monday as the former traded gasoline bombs and stones for water canons and teargas with the latter, Reuters reports.

The underlying frustrations of the current protests are linked to how many Tunisians feel that the Arab Spring revolution, which took place a decade ago, has not delivered on the promises made to citizens who are currently battling poverty and hopelessness. The revolution began in the 2010s and comprised a series of anti-governments protests calling for regime changes which began in Tunisia and then spread to several other North African countries including Egypt, Syria, Morocco and Libya.

Music
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The Best East African Songs of 2022 So Far

From Kenyan drill to bongo flava and everything in between, here are the best East African songs of the year so far featuring Buruklyn Boyz, Zuchu, NJERI, Diamond Platnumz, Khaligraph Jones and more.

The first half of 2022 has seen many rising stars of the region cement their place in the charts with some exquisite bodies of art.

As the new generation of East African artists innovates their look and sound they’re gaining from the rest of the world every day. From the likes of Buruklyn Boyz, NJERI and Zuchu, we have seen some spectacular singles and projects so far this year. On the other hand, the heavyweights kept their fans happy with plausible releases that raised the bar for all artists from this side of the continent.

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Music
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The 4 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Mr Eazi x MIchael Brun, Gyakie, Flvme, and Asari Music.

Every week, we highlight the top releases through our best music of the week column. Here's our round-up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks.

If you like these music lists, you can also check out our Best Songs of the Month columns following Nigerian, Ghanaian, East African and South African music.

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Music
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The 20 Best South African Songs of 2022 So Far

South African music keeps being part of the global music conversation and the artists are doing their best at exporting it across all frontiers.

South African popular music might be having the best years it has had in recent history. Carrying on from the momentum gained during the pandemic and its lockdown/travel restrictions, 2022 has been one of the years artists get to eat the fruits of their hard labour.

Contemporary artists are touring, performing at the biggest global stages amongst the best the world has to offer. From the Grammys and Coachella to Ibiza and Afronation, everyone is outside and is putting out their best music while at it. South African music is part of the global African music conversation and the artists are doing their best to export the music.

Check out our picks for The Best South Africa Songs of 2022 So Far below.

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Spotlight
Photo courtesy of Nurdin Momodu

Spotlight: Nurdin Momodu Is Using Animation To Share African Ingenuity

We spoke with the 3D artist and animator about his company Lotusfly Animations, Black excellence, and Africa's relationship with technology.

In our 'Spotlight' series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists, and more who are producing vibrant, original work.

In our latest piece, we spotlight Nigerian animator and 3D artist Nurdin Momodu. The Founder of Lotusfly Animations, Lagos-based Momodu's work beautifully articulates his vision of a technologically advanced world where Black excellence shines brightly. The animator founded his animation company in 2015, and has since pushed the boundaries of how African stories are told and shared. Keen on developing how African children see themselves on screens, Momodu and his team of established 3D artists are currently working on a kids' show titled, "Time Tech Kids".

We spoke with Momodu about following your passions, expressing Black excellence, and the representation that matters.

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Describe your background as an artist and the journey you've taken to get it to where it is today.

I never dreamt of pursuing a career as an artist, however, I always had an artistic eye. Life and its circumstances forced me to look within and harness the gifts I was given. The lack of jobs after pursuing a degree in microbiology was a turning point, and eight years ago, I discovered 3D animation and taught myself everything I could.

What are the central themes in your work?

I like to explore themes related to Afro-futurism, technology, and science fiction. I also like to look into deep emotions, melancholy and Black excellence.

How did you decide on using a digital medium for your art?

The moment I discovered 3D animation, I knew it was the medium for me -- the possibilities were endless. It felt so natural, I always had a fondness for computers, so expressing my art with one was a no-brainer.

Can you describe your artistic relationship with ‘Afro-futurism’ and African technology?

I think we are inseparable. I produced my first proof of concept titled “Jagabaan” because I wanted to express Black excellence and its relationship with technology and the future.

I imagine a time, far into the future, where Black people -- our culture, technology, stories, struggles of the past and present, and how they shaped the future -- dominate. However, the realities of everyday struggles in Africa make it challenging to envision this future. If my portrayal of Afro-futurism can connect with people just enough to enable them to ponder and believe in a future dominated by Black excellence, I’ll find fulfillment.

Can you talk about your use of colors in your work?

Black and Red are my favorite colors, I find them to be a default palette in my arsenal of colors. However, I am drawn to orange and cyan when lighting a shot or an image, especially when I think on a cinematic scale. I love making darker-looking art, but with a stylized look.

Night shots are particularly my favorite, so I go for desaturated colors with the exception of the focus to enable it to stand out from the background. I have an unhealthy obsession with colored neon lights. LOL.

How has the pandemic affected you creatively?

With the exception of mass hysteria due to Covid, lockdowns, and the #EndSars movement that took place in Nigeria, not much of my lifestyle changed. I began working from home in early 2019, and have been since, so the lockdown didn’t affect me much. I had an influx of jobs, so I spent most of the year working and improving my craft.

Photo by LotusFly Animations courtesy of Nurdin Momodu

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