Popular
Soweto, South Africa. Photo courtesy of Jessica Nabongo

Uganda’s Jessica Nabongo Is the First Black Woman to Visit Every Country in the World

Jessica Nabongo is a true, record-setting globe trotter.

Cue the parade, it's finally happened. Jessica Nabongo has officially become the first black woman to have visited every single country in the world. The Ugandan-American touched down in Seychelles on Sunday—the last to be visited on the long list of 195 countries. Over 50 friends and family members traveled with her to the East African archipelago to mark the historic event.


Nabongo has been traveling since the age of 6. Though she was born in the US, her parents are Ugandan and she's used both passports to travel the world. What's most remarkable is the frequency with which she's done so. As Africa News reports, Nabongo made the decision to attempt the global feat in 2017. At the time she had only traveled to 60 countries–-meaning she's travelled to 135 countries in just 2-and-a-half years, an average of just under 7 days per country.

Nabongo was chosen as one of our 100 Women of 2019, a list of impressive and impactful women from the continent and across the diaspora. When we interviewed her for the list, she told us the motivation behind her traveling:

"I began my journey to every country in the world because I am a geography nerd, curious about other cultures, and want to show the world through a lens that we rarely view it from—that of a black woman."

She also elaborated on her desire to alter the global narrative and perception surrounding of a lot of destinations–particularly in Africa–and highlight "that many countries are dangerous, that people are miserable, that you cannot have nice, luxury, vacations on the continent."

If Nabongo inspires you to get off your couch, grab your passport, pick a destination and just go–she's already made ways to help you out. Check out this article she penned for OkayAfrica about her tips for first-time solo travelers. Keep up with her journey and catch her if you can via her Instagram.

News
Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: 808x On Crafting Different Sounds For the Diverse Innanetwav Roster

808x, the in-house producer for South Africa's popular hip-hop collective/label Innanetwav, breaks down his working process with artists and the importance of energy.