Visual is a screenshot from the pre-recording.

Umlilo performing at "Blooming Sounds from Joburg" at Constitution Hill in Hillbrow South Africa.

South African Queer Artist Umlilo Shares Striking Electro Performance

South African queer activist and musician, Umlilo, has released his post-apocalyptic live-show performance recorded at the Women's Jail at Constitution Hill. The dark, avant-garde and politically charged visuals make for a revolutionary watch.

South Africa's boundary breaking artist Umlilo has released a coronavirus-related, post dystopian performance. Umlilo returns with a stylish and futuristic flair in the twenty minute mini concert. The live show was recently recorded at South Africa's historic Women's Jail at Constitution Hill known as ConHill. The queer artivist, artist and activist, delivers a stunning performance that reignites femme power and celebrates all things queer. Umlilo reportedly performed songs from their acclaimed EPs Shades of Kwaai and Aluta. Not one to shy aware from the politics of the body, gender, sexuality and society this performance is one for a watch party with woke friends.


Read: Watch Umlilo & Sean K's Video For 'Emoyeni'

The Cape Town based artist gives a salacious show accompanied by international dance sensations Llewellyn "Lulubelle" Mnguni, Kyle Holland, and Roberto "Lotion the Star". The avant-garde performance starts with the artist wearing a dystopian oxygen mask with a sexy leather outfit finished off with luminous green scarf. Umlilo is known for their mystique and gender-bending style and the performance unravels into a curation of their unique signature. A provocateur, Umlilo's performance carries a high energy yet is at times somber; voice recordings of apartheid activists musing on apartheid play in the background. The androgynous fearless artist has previously been commended by Vicefor their artistic flexibility and intellectually thought provoking works. They perform songs with elements of soul, kwaito, hip-hop, electro, gqom and punk.

Famous struggle icon, Winnie Madikizela Mandela, was one of many of prolific apartheid activists imprisoned in the Women's Jail. ConHill has turned the site from its dark past to one that celebrates all freedom. Afropunk and other radical events are held at the Women's Jail. Umlilo's commentary on queer slurs and South Africa's racism are creatively captured throughout the performance. They capture the spirit of their generation with political musings, queer activism and dance-floor bangers.

Shades of Kwaai andAluta are both available to stream on Spotify.

Watch Umlilo live at "Blooming Sounds of Joburg" recorded at Constitution Hill on YouTube.

Umlilo live - Blooming Sounds from Joburgwww.youtube.com

Music

Listen to a Fela Kuti Tribute Album Featuring D'Angelo, Questlove, Nile Rodgers​ & More

2002's Red Hot + Riot albumis available on streaming platforms for the first time.

Red Hot has made the their Fela Kutitribute album Red Hot + Riot available for the first time on all streaming platforms to mark its 20th anniversary.

Red Hot + Riot features notable contributions from an all-star guest ensemble that includes D’Angelo, Questlove, Femi Kuti, Talib Kweli, Sade, Tony Allen, Macy Gray, Nile Rodgers, Jorge Ben Jor, Baba Maal, Meshell Ndegeocello, Dead Prez, Kelis, Roy Hargrove, Archie Shepp, and many others.

The updated 20th anniversary version includes bonus material including a remastered version of the entire project. The project also includes a cover of “Sorrow Tears & Blood” by Bilal, an acoustic version of “Trouble Sleep” with Baba Maal accompanied by the legendary kora player Kaouding Cissoko and an extended version of Sade’s “By Your Side” by Stuart Matthewman.

The original album had to be heavily edited to fit the time limit of a physical CD. This new version includes a vast amount of bonus material that includes an extended versions of many tracks, including early mixes, acapellas, instrumentals and more.

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Music
Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Roc Nation

Burna Boy, Tems, Zakes Bantwini, Eddy Kenzo & More Are Nominated For 2023 Grammy Awards

They are joined by Angélique Kidjo, Rocky Dawuni, Nomcebo Zikode and more African artists on the nominees list for next year's Grammy Awards.

The Recording Academy has released its list of nominees for the upcoming 2023 Grammy Awards show and several African artists have been given a nod.

Nigerian superstar Burna Boyand Beninese legend Angélique Kidjo are both nominated for Best Global Music Album.

Uganda's Eddy Kenzo, Ghana's Rocky Dawuni, South Africa's Wouter Kellerman, Zakes Bantwini and Nomcebo Zikode, and Burna Boy are all in the running for Best Global Music Performance.

Nigeria's continually buzzing Tems is nominated for "Wait For U," her collaboration with Future and Drake, under the Best Melodic Rap Performance and Best Rap Song. Angélique Kidjo is also nominated for her Woman King song "Keep Rising" under the Best Song Written for Visual Media category.

African music has been taking center stage, and the recent nominations have further proven that the world is paying attention to the sounds coming from the African continent.

The 65th installment of the award show will take place on Sunday, February 5, 2023, at the Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles. It will be exciting to see all of the honorees from the continent and how their hard work has paid off.

Last year, Burna Boy, Wizkid, Tems, Femi Kuti, Made Kuti, Angélique Kidjo, Rocky Dawuni, and Black Coffee were the African nominees.

Last year, Kidjo won an award for her 16th studio album Mother Nature, marking her fifth Grammy win. During a visit to Ghana earlier this year, Harvey Mason Jr., CEO of the Recording Academy, told reporters that the Grammys were considering an Afrobeats category. Mason said he had been meeting with important decision-makers in the genre to explore the possibility.

Scroll down to see the list of African artists nominated for the award show this year.

Check out the complete list of nominees here.

Best Global Music Performance

“Udhero Na,” Arooj Aftab and Anoushka Shankar
“Gimme Love,” Matt B and Eddy Kenzo
“Last Last,” Burna Boy
“Neva Bow Down,” Rocky Dawuni featuring Blvk H3ro
“Bayethe,” Wouter Kellerman, Zakes Bantwini and Nomcebo Zikode

Best Global Music Album

“Shuruaat,” Berklee Indian Ensemble
“Love, Damini,” Burna Boy
“Queen of Sheba,” Angélique Kidjo and Ibrahim Maalouf
“Between Us … (Live),” Anoushka Shankar, Metropole Orkest and Jules Buckley featuring Manu Delago
“Sakura,” Masa Takumi

Best Melodic Rap Performance

“Beautiful,” DJ Khaled featuring Future and SZA
“Wait for U,” Future featuring Drake and Tems
“First Class,” Jack Harlow
“Die Hard,” Kendrick Lamar featuring Blxst and Amanda Reifer
“Big Energy (Live),” Latto

Best Rap Song

“Churchill Downs,” Ace G, BEDRM, Matthew Samuels, Tahrence Brown, Rogét Chahayed, Aubrey Graham, Jack Harlow and Jose Velazquez, songwriters (Jack Harlow featuring Drake)

“God Did,’ Tarik Azzouz, E. Blackmon, Khaled Khaled, F. LeBlanc, Shawn Carter, John Stephens, Dwayne Carter, William Roberts and Nicholas Warwar, songwriters (DJ Khaled featuring Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, John Legend and Fridayy)

“The Heart Part 5,” Jake Kosich, Johnny Kosich, Kendrick Lamar and Matt Schaeffer, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

“Pushin P,” Lucas Depante, Nayvadius Wilburn, Sergio Kitchens, Wesley Tyler Glass and Jeffery Lamar Williams, songwriters (Gunna and Future featuring Young Thug)

“Wait for U,” Tejiri Akpoghene, Floyd E. Bentley III, Jacob Canady, Isaac De Boni, Aubrey Graham, Israel Ayomide Fowobaje, Nayvadius Wilburn, Michael Mule, Oluwatoroti Oke and Temilade Openiyi, songwriters (Future featuring Drake and Tems)

Best Song Written for Visual Media

“Be Alive” from “King Richard”; Beyoncé́ and Darius Scott Dixson, songwriters (Beyoncé́)

“Carolina” from “Where the Crawdads Sing”; Taylor Swift, songwriter (Taylor Swift)

“Hold My Hand” from “Top Gun: Maverick”; Bloodpop and Stefani Germanotta, songwriters (Lady Gaga)

“Keep Rising (The Woman King)” from “The Woman King”; Angelique Kidjo, Jeremy Lutito and Jessy Wilson, songwriters (Jessy Wilson featuring Angelique Kidjo)

“Nobody Like U” from “Turning Red”; Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (4*Town, Jordan Fisher, Finneas O’Connell, Josh Levi, Topher Ngo, Grayson Villanueva)

“We Don’t Talk About Bruno” from “Encanto”; Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Carolina Gaitán — La Gaita, Mauro Castillo, Adassa, Rhenzy Feliz, Diane Guerrero, Stephanie Beatriz & Encanto — Cast)

Africa In Your Earbuds
Photo Credit: Screenshot from Droit Libre TV

Niger Singer Hamsou Garba Dies At 64

One of Niger's prominent musicians, Hamsou Garba, has died at the age of 64.


Hamsou Garba, the Maradi, Niger-born singer who had a successful career that spanned the course of three decades, recently died in a hospital in Niamey after battling a long-term illness. She was 64. The singer, who was called Niger's "music box", made a name for herself for her signature melodic singing in the indigenous language of Hausa. Throughout the long span of her career, the Niger legend led a band of women and men, singing in indigenous languages, making their mark on indigenous African music. The theme of her songs were primarily focused on love, religion, and social issues. As a testament to her activism, the singer was briefly jailed in 2016, after she criticized the government during a segment of her performance where she called the then-embattled opposition leader Hama Amadou "Niger's Mandela."

The singer spent 10 days in jail at the Niamey Prison in Niger. At that time, she was accused of inciting civil disobedience, and triggering unrest. During the course of her career, she also used her radio show to shine a light on the ongoing social issues in Niger's government. The tragic death of the legendary singer has been called a "national loss" by the national musician's union.

Garba's first completed album, Gargadi, was released in 2008, and it chronicled much of the themes she had become well-known and celebrated for. That album was quickly followed by Tout est possible, which she released in 2009. In 2011, she began working on two more albums, titled Les hommes de l’histoire and Aouran dollé.

Listen to one of her most recent songs "Andounia" below.

Style
Photo: Patrick Kovarik/AFP via Getty Images

What To Expect at the History-Making Chanel Show in Dakar

For the first time ever on African soil, the French luxury house will showcase its Métiers d’art 2023 collection in the Senegalese capital this week.

Even though fashion has been embracing virtual concepts like the metaverse, some classics never go out of style. A prime example of this is Chanel’s Métiers d’art. Existing outside of the official catwalk calendar, the Métiers d’art happens annually to recognize and celebrate the works of specialist artisans and craftspeople that the fashion house has taken under its wings for decades.

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