Video

Video: Tinariwen Meet TV On The Radio With "Tenere Taqqim Tossam"

Today, over on Pitchfork, we were excited to find the beautiful new video of Malian blues nomads, Tinariwen, who collaborated with two of our faves - Tunde Adebimpe and Kyp Malone from TV on the Radio for "Tenere Taqqim Tossam."   We'll definitely be adding this track to the regular rotation alongside TVOTR's latest release, which we've had on constant replay for weeks - Nine Types Of Light.  The collabo makes complete sense - you can hear Adebimpe's signature vocal stylings complement the rhythmic gritty desert blues Tinariwen achieves on this new release - a departure from the more psychedelic electric-guitar based sounds they are known for, as they recorded with mainly acoustic guitars and un-amplified percussion here.  Perhaps Adebimpe's Nigerian roots will lead to even more African collabos (we hope!).


Be on the look out for Tinariwen's newest release, Tassili, due out August 30th on Anti, which also features Wilco's Nels Cline and the horn section from the Dirty Dozen Brass Band.  Tinariwen's full U.S. and European tour dates are after the jump.

TOUR DATES:

06-26 Paris, France - Le Centquatre 104

06-28 Paris, France - Theatre des Bouffes du Nord

07-02 Comblain, Belgium - Comblain Jazz Festival

07-07 Chicago, IL - Lincoln Hall

07-08 Minneapolis, MN - Cedar Cultural Center

07-09-10 Winnepeg, Manitoba - Winnipeg Folk Festival

07-12 Solana Beach, CA - Belly Up

07-13 Los Angeles, CA - Troubadour

07-14 San Francisco, CA - Bimbo's 365 Club

07-16 Seattle, WA - Neumos

07-17 Vancouver, British Columbia - Vancouver Folk Fest

07-20 New York, NY - Highline Ballroom

07-21 New York, NY - Grassroots Festival

07-23 Valence, France - Valence Festival

07-24 Meze, France - Festival de Thau

07-27 Budapest, Hungary - Zold Paron

07-29 Berlin, Germany - Haus der Kulturen der Welt

07-31 Niigata, Japan - Fuji Rock Festival

08-27 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil - Back to Black Festival

09-03 Birmingham, England - Moseley Folk Festival

09-04 Larmer Tree Gardens, England - End of the Road Festival

09-21 Paris, France - 104

09-25 Ljubljana, Slovenia - Krizanke Amphitheater

09-26 Zagreb, Croatia - Aquarius Club

09-30 Los Angeles, CA - Ooh La La!

10-05 Magny-Le-Hongre, France - File 7

10-06 Cologne, Germany - Philharmonie

10-07 Blois, Franc - Halle Aux Grains

10-08 Begles, France - Rendez-vous des Terres Neuvese

10-09 Laval, France - 6 Par 4

10-11 Lyon, France - Ninkasi Kao

10-12 Poitiers, France - Theatre Scene Nationale

10-13 Nanterre, France - Maison De La Musique

10-15 Zurich, Switzterland - Kaufleuten

10-16 Lausanne, Switzerland - Les Docks

10-18 Amsterdam, Netherlands - Paradiso

10-19 Brussels, Belgium - Ancienne Belgique

10-20 Mannheim, Germany - Alte Feuerwache

10-21 Berlin, Germany - Kesselhaus

10-22 Warsaw, Poland - Palladium

10-23 Wroclaw, Poland - Eter Club

10-27 London, England - Roundhouse

10-29 Los Angeles, CA - Luckman Fine Arts Complex

11-18 Boston, MA - Paradise Rock Club

12-04 Minehead, England - All Tomorrow's Parties

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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