Style
Photo via Virgil Abloh's Instagram page.

Virgil Abloh Has Presented His First Collection for Louis Vuitton at Paris Fashion Week

The acclaimed Ghanaian-American designer made a bold statement today as Louis Vuitton's menswear artistic director with his SS19 collection.

Since Louis Vuitton announced the appointment of Virgil Abloh, the Ghanaian-American designer behind fashion label Off-White, as its new head of menswear, the anticipation and excitement of his first collection for the French luxury brand has been at an all-time high.

"This opportunity to think through what the next chapter of design and luxury will mean at a brand that represents the pinnacle of luxury was always a goal in my wildest dreams," Abloh said back in March. "And to show a younger generation that there is no one way anyone in this kind of position has to look is a fantastically modern spirit in which to start."

Abloh presented a glimpse of this next chapter at Paris Fashion Week today with Louis Vuitton's SS19 menswear collection. Models walked the long rainbow runway donning tailored all-white ensembles to bright and colorful streetwear looks that included utility vests and marble prints, Highsnobiety reports.


The menswear artistic director also provided a t-shirt and show notes to every guest that includes a document entitled, The Vocabulary According to Virgil Abloh which gives his own take and definitions of fashion terminology. Under the letter 'R' his definintion of the word 'rainbow' encompasses the feel of the show:

A kaleidoscopic palette evolving from off-white to polychromatic, synchronously forming a holograph archway knowns to represent dream. A motif in The Wizard of Oz, which provide construct to the Spring-Summer 2019 collection.

Friends and supporters of Abloh, including Kid Cudi, Theophilus London, A$AP Nast and Playboi Carti, were also among the models walking the runway in the show. Abloh ended his show walking the runway with tears of joy, embracing Kanye West as he took in this historic moment.

Take a glimpse at some of the looks from the show below.




View the full collection here.

News
Image via TONL.

Uganda Has Lost Millions of Internet Users as a Result of Its Controversial Social Media Tax

The infamous tax is effectually driving Ugandans off the internet.

The number of internet users in Uganda has declined significantly since the implementation of the highly-criticized tax on social media, which went into effect in July of last year.

While the government claimed that the tax would assist in raising government revenue and help "maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently," said Uganda's Finance Minister Matia Kasaija at the time. President Museveni also suggested that the tax would help "curb gossip" online.

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Cover art for Riky Rick's "You and I"

The 14 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Riky Rick, Mr Eazi, Moonchild Sanelly, Burna Boy, Blinky Bill, Niniola and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week and read about some of our selections ahead.

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Literature
Image courtesy of Doubleday.

Oyinkan Braithwaite's 'My Sister the Serial Killer' Is the Lagos-Set Novel Rocking the Crime Thriller Genre

We speak with the Nigerian author about the success of her debut novel, and breaking the boundaries of "African Lit."

"I have always been drawn to dark topics," says Oyinkan Braithwaite, the 30-year-old Nigerian author behind the critical darling of a novel My Sister, the Serial Killer.

Her declaration helps explain the subject and title of her debut novel, which tells the story of Ayoola, a young woman who has developed a not-so-healthy habit of murdering her boyfriends, leaving her older sister, the book's protagonist, Korede to clean up her mess. You may have noticed it's ubiquitous cover—which features a young black woman wearing a headwrap, casually looking on as a knife-wielding hands is reflected in her sunglasses—on your timeline or at your local store. The internationally-released, Nigerian-made novel sits confidently on retail shelves previously reserved for mass-market thrillers.

The dark and humorous, Lagos-set novel is extreme—but not just because of all the murdering that happens. It also examines the extreme nature of the many things that can push people to the edge. For the sisters, it's: intergenerational trauma, abuse, the prevalence of a culture that rewards beauty above all else, as well as having to battle with their own personal shortcomings—just to name a few.

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