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Photo via Virgil Abloh's Instagram page.

Virgil Abloh Has Presented His First Collection for Louis Vuitton at Paris Fashion Week

The acclaimed Ghanaian-American designer made a bold statement today as Louis Vuitton's menswear artistic director with his SS19 collection.

Since Louis Vuitton announced the appointment of Virgil Abloh, the Ghanaian-American designer behind fashion label Off-White, as its new head of menswear, the anticipation and excitement of his first collection for the French luxury brand has been at an all-time high.

"This opportunity to think through what the next chapter of design and luxury will mean at a brand that represents the pinnacle of luxury was always a goal in my wildest dreams," Abloh said back in March. "And to show a younger generation that there is no one way anyone in this kind of position has to look is a fantastically modern spirit in which to start."

Abloh presented a glimpse of this next chapter at Paris Fashion Week today with Louis Vuitton's SS19 menswear collection. Models walked the long rainbow runway donning tailored all-white ensembles to bright and colorful streetwear looks that included utility vests and marble prints, Highsnobiety reports.


The menswear artistic director also provided a t-shirt and show notes to every guest that includes a document entitled, The Vocabulary According to Virgil Abloh which gives his own take and definitions of fashion terminology. Under the letter 'R' his definintion of the word 'rainbow' encompasses the feel of the show:

A kaleidoscopic palette evolving from off-white to polychromatic, synchronously forming a holograph archway knowns to represent dream. A motif in The Wizard of Oz, which provide construct to the Spring-Summer 2019 collection.

Friends and supporters of Abloh, including Kid Cudi, Theophilus London, A$AP Nast and Playboi Carti, were also among the models walking the runway in the show. Abloh ended his show walking the runway with tears of joy, embracing Kanye West as he took in this historic moment.

Take a glimpse at some of the looks from the show below.




View the full collection here.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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