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Watch the Trailer for Wale's New Studio Album 'Wow...That's Crazy'

He says this sixth studio album will be his last.

This year has been a phenomenal year for Nigerian artists both on the continent and those part of the diaspora. Nigerian-American rapper, Wale, recently took to social media to announce that he'll be dropping his sixth studio album Wow...That's Crazy on the October 11th. This new project comes after he released three singles this year including "Gemini (2 sides)", "BGM" and "On Chill", a track he worked on with Jeremih. While fans are excited by news of the upcoming project, Wale has indicated that this will be his last album.


The album trailer for Wow...That's Crazy is definitely an interesting one. Titled "Label Me Crazy", it shows the artist speaking to his therapist in what is his second session. After the therapist asks him why he's come in to see her, Wale tells her that it's because of the woes he's been experiencing with his record label but won't say whether the problem lies with him or with them when she probes further. Shortly after his response, three versions of the artist appear and sit beside him to which the therapist quips, "Y'all doing too much." The trailer ends with the title of the upcoming album as well as its release date.

Speaking about his new album, Wale said that, ""[T]his album is my most personal by far. The majority of my time making it I just knew it would be my last."

Watch the trailer for Wow...That's Crazy below:


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