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Watch Burna Boy's Interview on Hot 97's 'Ebro in the Morning'.

Watch Burna Boy's Interview on Hot 97's 'Ebro In The Morning'

Burna Boy talks about his latest album 'Twice As Tall', working with Diddy as well as the difference between Afrofusion versus Afrobeat.

Last month, Nigerian superstar Burna Boy dropped his highly-anticipated album titled Twice As TallTwice As Tall last month. The album is the official follow-up to the Grammy-nominated African Giant album which was released in 2019. Twice As Tall features the likes of Chris Martin, Naughty By Nature, Sauti Sol, Stormzy and Youssou N'Dour. Executive-produced by Sean "Diddy" Combs and co-produced by Mama Burna (Bosede Ogulu), the album has already recently snagged the record for having the biggest opening weekend ever for an album (local or international) on the African continent (Sub-Saharan Africa markets). Recently, Burna Boy joined Hot 97's Ebro In The Morning to talk about his latest album, working with Diddy as well as Afrofusion versus Afrobeat.


READ: Here Are All the Samples In Burna Boy's 'Twice As Tall'

The interview begins with Burna Boy speaking about how exciting and "interesting" it was to work with Diddy on the project. "We had to do it all on Zoom...We had to kind of create the same environment in different places at the same time." The conversation moves on briefly to one of the tracks on the album titled "Alarm Clock", an upbeat number with an insane rhythm. Ebro jokingly pleads with the Nigerian artist to make the track much longer to which he responds that he'll be performing an extended version of the song soon.

Naturally, Peter Rosenberg asks Burna why he refers to his particular sound as Afrofusion as opposed to Afrobeat. Burna Boy then responds by saying:

"...Afrofusion is me, I created that. The same way Afrobeat is Fela Kuti, he created that. There's a difference. I don't play every instrument. I'm not Fela, basically. I'm Burna Boy and we go about things rather very differently. It's a different genre. It just comes from Africa."

The trio go on to speak about drawing distinctions between the different genres of African music as opposed to "lumping everybody together". Burna says, "It's not fair. It's almost like putting hip-hop, R&B and dancehall into the same category, saying it's one thing and naming it Ameribeats." He goes on to add that, "It doesn't do justice to what's really going on. But at the same start, its like, we have to start somewhere."

It's a super chilled interview and of course Burna Boy is his usual mellow self––a definite must watch.

Watch the full interview below:

Burna Boy On Working w/ Diddy, AfroFusion, BET Awards & 'Twice as Tall' www.youtube.com

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It's Official: British Vogue Has Made 2022 The Year of the African Model

The major fashion magazine's February 2022 issue features 9 gloriously Black and African models - and we can't get enough.

Sigh... The Black Woman.

Legendary fashion and lifestyle magazine British Vogue has set the tone and welcomed in a new era with their latest cover, celebrating Black women in all of their glory. In what is arguably their most diverse, Afro-centric issue to date, the February 2022 issue of the popular magazine features 9 glorious (and Black) African models. Their latest issue, which celebrates "The Rise of The African Model", features South Sudanese models Adut Akech, Akon Changkou, and Anok Yai, Ethiopian beauty Akway Amar, Senegalese-Italian Dibaa Maty, Nigeria's Jumbo Janet, Nyaguaa from Sierre Leone, Australian Abény Nhial, and American model Majesty Amare.

Photographer Rafael Pavarotti captured the group's beauty, and British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful's vision beautifully. On the cover, Enninful says, "I saw all these incredible models from across Africa who were just so vivacious and smart. These girls are redefining what it is to be a fashion model. He went on to speak about the soon-to-be-historic cover on his Instagram, writing, "No longer just one or two dark-skinned girls mingled backstage, but a host of top models took a meaningful, substantial and equal place among the most successful women working in fashion today. It means so much to me to see it."

Echoing Edward's words and highlighting the importance of having diverse models on both sides - the model and the viewer - model Adut told the fashion magazine, "When I first started modeling internationally... I would literally be the only Black, dark-skinned girl in the show. There were no Sudanese models, no African models," the 22-year-old model said, "Now, I go to a show and there are girls from my country, girls from Africa who look like me. So yes, there has been a huge change. It has gone from me being the only one at a show, to 15 or 20 of us. I'm just so happy that we are finally at this place. I was tired of always feeling out of place, and feeling like an outcast."



Social media lost it when the cover dropped, many sharing the emotional impact seeing so many Black models on an international cover has over them.



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Nigeria's Government Has Lifted Its Twitter Ban

We chat to two Nigerians working in media about the restoration of Twitter across the country.