Popular
Still taken from YouTube.

Watch Cosmopolitan SA's 'What it's Like to be a Woman for a Day'

The video, which features Coconut Kelz, J Something, Nasty C and more, reverses the roles to highlight just how much harassment South African women encounter daily.

Two days ago, South Africa kicked off its 16 days of activism, part of an international campaign against gender-based violence.

Cosmopolitan South Africa recently released a short video entitled "What it's Like to be a Woman for a Day" which highlights just how much harassment South African women encounter on a daily basis from the time they get to the bus stop to happy hour after work—and every place in between.

What's different with this video, however, is that the roles are reversed and men are the ones being harassed. Hilarious political satirist Coconut Kelz takes the lead in the skit alongside Mi Casa's J Something, rapper Nasty C and several other prominent South African men.


The opening scene of "What it's Like to be a Woman for a Day" depicts a bus stop where J Something is seated while waiting for the bus to arrive. Coconut Kelz, who plays the stereotypical harasser of a man, takes a seat next to him and tells him to smile because "[he'd] look much prettier".

The scene that follows is set in a coffee shop where Nasty C is grabbing a cup of coffee. Unfortunately for him, he has an uncomfortable encounter as Coconut Kelz deliberately brushes her hand against his then proceeds to hold his coffee at ransom unless he gives her his number of course. From having one's personal space invaded at the gym to being forced to leave the bar during happy hour, the video makes use of humor and irony—and brilliantly so—to highlight the level of harassment South African women encounter daily.

Over the past few months, South African women have protested several times against the frequent accounts of gender-based violence, rape and femicide in the country.

Watch Cosmopolitan South Africa's "What it's Like to be a Woman for a Day" below:

COSMO Men Stand Up: What It's Like To Be A Woman For A Day | Real Talk | Cosmopolitan SA www.youtube.com

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.