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In Conversation: Chiwetel Ejiofor Speaks on the Inspiration Behind 'The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind'

OkayAfrica's own Abiola Oke sits down with the Nigerian-British actor for an in-depth chat on his directorial debut in this new video.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, the inspiring film following the life of Malawian inventor William Kamkwamba's life, is now available to stream on Netflix. A Sundance 2019 favorite and the directorial debut of Nigerian-British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind depicts William's unconventional invention to save his family and village from famine.

We were able to have Ejiofor come by our offices and chat with OkayAfrica and Okayplayer's CEO, Abiola Oke, to learn more about what inspired him to develop William's remarkable story for the big screen, the importance to include Malawian language in the film, the want for more African storytelling in Hollywood and more.

Take a look below.


In Conversation: Chiwetel Ejiofor Talks "The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind" with Abiola Oke youtu.be

Credits

Director + Editor + Sound: Greg Poole

Cinematographer: Chris Lytwyn

Co-Producers: Antoinette Isama and Jasmine Michel

Colorist: Tarek Hefny

Production Assistant: Winnie Kassa

Intern: Caira Blackwell

Video

Video: Davido Talks About His New Album 'A Good Time' & How the World Has Opened Up to Afrobeats

In 'Moments With: Davido,' the Nigerian superstar tells us about the massive success of "Fall," his relationship with Wizkid, collaborating with Popcaan, and much more.

Davido stopped by our offices in New York City during the packed days around his new album, A Good Time.

The Nigerian superstar sat down with OkayAfrica and spoke in-depth about what made "Fall" such a massive success, the new album, his reported (past) beef with Wizkid, collaborating with Popcaan on "Risky," Western artists using African sounds, and—most importantly—how "it's the world to Africa right now."

Watch our Moments With video with Davido below.

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Still from Burna Boy's Tiny Desk concert video via NPR.

Watch Burna Boy's Mellowed-Out 'Tiny Desk' Concert

Watch the 'African Giant' run through some of his hits like 'Gbona,' 'Ye' and more for NPR's Tiny Desk concert series.

Burna Boy is the latest artist to grace NPR's famous Tiny Desk.

The Nigerian "afrofusion" star took to the set for a mellowed out performance of four of his biggest tracks. Getting straight to business, the artist opened his set with a toned down rendition of his single "Gbona" before heading into the socially-aware "Wetin Man Go Do." It's much calmer of a performance than we're used to seeing from the artist.

Next he performs a funky version of "Dangote," before rounding his set out with his magnum opus of sorts "Ye." He's backed by the band The Outsiders and vocalist Christina Matovu throughout.

Burna Boy has had a stellar year, releasing his seminal album African Giant, performing at Coachella and winning several awards—including 'Best African Act' at the BET Awards—in the process.

Check out his full Tiny Desk performance below, and revisit a recent Tiny Desk performance from British-Nigerian rapper Dave from last week and check out Burna Boy's okay acoustics performance of 'Anybody' from August.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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