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Watch Three South African Illustrators Talk About Netflix's Strong Black Lead Content

Karabo Moletsane, Delmaine Donson and Sinomonde Ngwane illustrate what 'When They See Us', 'Good Girls' and 'She's Gotta Have It' all mean to them as artists.

At the BET awards last year, Netflix aired their "A Great Day in Hollywood" photo which captured Black talent such as Spike Lee, Ava DuVernay, Lena Waithe and a few others all in the parking lot of Universal Studios. That moment had been inspired by the 1958 photo "A Great Day in Harlem".

Additionally, there was a video which featured the 47 Black talent whose films and series are currently being streamed on. This initiative became known as the Strong Black Lead Content which Netflix's Director of Brand and Editorial, Maya Watson Banks, described as being "relatable and real, always unapologetically Black, and assumes context and knowledge so that content doesn't need to be watered down."

Netflix spoke to three South African illustrators, Karabo Moletsane, Delmaine Donson and Sinomonde Ngwane, about their favorite Strong Black Lead Content and got them to each produce an artwork.


Karabo Moletsane is an illustrator, street artist and graphic designer who says that "art has given her the necessary tools to give an accurate representation of her narrative". Speaking about the personal importance of Ava DuVernay's powerful four-part series When They See Us, Moletsane says that, "What resonated for me was that this is not a First World or Third World problem—this is a global Black problem.

This is the artwork she produces:

Still taken from video.

Sinomonde Ngwane is a graphic designer and illustrator who decided to illustrate Ruby, a character in the comedy series Good Girls. Ngwane says that, "I love how she's entered a male-dominated world and excelled at it. I think Ruby is a metaphor for someone who is redefining, someone who is challenging, someone who is taking control of their life and dominating where they are."

This is the artwork that she produces:

Still taken from video.

Delmaine Donson, a photographer, digital artist and oil painter, describes a Strong Black Lead as someone who can "inspire change and is strong enough to take the first step to creating change. A person that is able to influence the minds of others and give them a different perspective". She says that she relates quite well to Nola Darling, the main character in Spike Lee's She's Gotta Have It. Donson describes Nola Darling as a woman who is "bold, makes her own rules and doesn't live under the laws of patriarchy."

This is the artwork that she produces:

Still taken from video.

Watch the full video below:

Why I Drew This | Strong Black Lead | Netflix South Africa www.youtube.com

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Rodger Bosch/Getty Images

South African Designer Athi Patra Ruga is Collaborating with Dior

The designer has produced two bags for the international fashion label's Lady Art Project.

Athi Patra Ruga is an Umtata-born South African visual artist who explores sexuality, HIV/AIDS, queerness and African culture in fashion, performance and contemporary art. Recently, he joined fellow designers Rina Banerjee, Maria Nepomuceno, Mickalene Thomas, Jia Lee and Eduardo Terrazas in designing bags for the fourth installment of Dior's Lady Art Project which sees designers from all over the world re-imagining the fashion label's iconic Lady Dior bag. This year's group made use of techniques including embroidery, patchwork, quilting and printing, which experts have suggested may symbolize the resurgence of textile art in couture.

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Watch Tshego and King Monada’s Music Video for ‘No Ties’

Tshego shares visuals for 'No Ties' featuring King Monada.

Tshego has finally let go of the visuals for his collaboration with house hitmaker King Monada. The song has proven a fan-favorite from Tshego's recently released album Pink Panther since it was released as a single.

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Keith Roper/Flickr Creative Commons

Kais Saied is Set to Become Tunisia's Next President

While official results have not been published, the retired academic reportedly secured 76 percent of the votes according to the exit polls.

Last week, Tunisia held its legislative elections, according to reports by Aljazeera. The Ennahda Movement obtained 52 seats in the 217-member parliament while the Karoui's Heart of Tunisia party came second, with 38 seats. While the presidential elections were only scheduled to take place in November, they were pushed forward after the country's first democratically-elected president, Beji Caid Essebsi, passed away in July. Two independent candidates, media mogul Nabil Karoui and retired law professor Kais Saied, have been facing off in the presidential runoff. However, recent exit polls suggest that Saied secured between 72 and 77 percent of the vote.

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Illustration by Simone Martin-Newberry

A 15-Year-Old Nigerian Student Lends Her Voice to the Fight Against Boko Haram With Graphic Novel

Aisha Mustapha's graphic novel about her experiences under Boko Haram was published today for International Day of the Girl.

Aisha Mustapha, is a 15-year-old student from Nigeria, using her voice to tell her own story. The young writer recently penned a graphic novel about her experience fleeing Boko Haram, locating her family and trying to further her education. It's a heavy subject, obviously, but with her graphic novel, she offers a voice for young people directly affected by the crisis in Northern Nigeria.

The book was published today to mark the International Day of the Girl, a day established by the United Nations in 2011 to "highlight and address the needs and challenges girls face, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights."

Aisha's talent for storytelling has previously been highlighted in Assembly, a by-girls-for-girls publication by the Malala Fund that brought Aisha's graphic novel to life, premiering it today in conjunction with International Day of the GIrl. Tess Thomas, Assembly's editor, elaborated on the purpose of the publication saying, "We believe in the power of girls' voices to generate change. Our publication provides girls with a platform so their opinions and experiences can inform decisions about their futures."

Aisha's words were illustrated by artist Simone Martin-Newberry, who had this to say about the process of creating the visuals for the graphic novel: "I was very moved by Aisha's story, and really wanted to treat it sensitively and do it justice with my illustrations. My aim was to capture the real emotions and actions of the story, but also keep my artwork bright and colorful and full of pattern, to help reflect Aisha's amazing youthful spirit."

Check out some excerpts from the piece below and head here to read it in full.
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