Video
Photo courtesy of JM Films

Watch Tiwa Savage's Striking New Music Video for '49-99'

On her latest single, the artist references Fela Kuti and addresses poverty in her home country.

Tiwa Savage shares her latest song and video "49-99."

The pulsating track sees the artist referencing Fela Kuti's famous "49 sitting, 99 standing" line from his 1978 song "Shuffering and Shmiling." Throughout the track, the Nigerian artist sings about the pursuit of money in her home country, offering commentary on widespread poverty.

"'49-99' is a term coined from the hard life many Nigerians go through," explains the artist in a press release. "A transit bus serves as a case study. It ought to have only 49 seated passengers, however due to poor economic conditions, we often have nearly twice that number of passengers standing (99)."


Photo courtesy of JM Films

The artist takes things to the next level in the Meji Alabi-directed music video, offering a striking visual that features colorful imagery and symbolism. One of the most striking scenes captures the singer and a group of women dressed in blue and white uniform with their hair in threaded styles—a direct reference to the iconic portraits of Congolese schoolgirls taken in 1972 by photographer Eliot Elisofon.

In another scene the artist is laid out with lengthy braids forming intricate patterns around her. The image is reminiscent of Diana Ross' bold and unforgettable flower-accented look from the late 60s. The video sees the singer once again incorporating the public transit theme as she performs on top of a yellow danfo bus.

Photo courtesy of JM Films

The artist was last featured on DJ Spinall's "Dis Love" alongside Wizkid. Before then, she dropped the single "Shotan" featuring Zlatan. She's had a busy 2019, signing a major international deal with Universal Music Group earlier this year, and featuring on Beyoncé's recently released The Lion King: The Gift compilation album.

Watch the music video for her latest,"49-99" below.

Tiwa Savage - 49-99 www.youtube.com

Spotlight
Photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A Year After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Maintain That Nothing Has Changed

Despite the disbandment of the SARS units, young Nigerians are still being treated as criminals. We talk to several of them about their experiences since the #EndSARS protests.

On September 12th, Tobe, a 22-year-old student at the University of Nigeria's Enugu Campus was on his way to Shoprite to hang out with his friends when the tricycle he had boarded was stopped by policemen. At first, Tobe thought they were about to check the driver's documents, but he was wrong. "An officer told me to come down, he started searching me like I was a criminal and told me to pull down my trousers, I was so scared that my mind was racing in different ways, I wasn't wearing anything flashy nor did I have an iPhone or dreads — things they would use to describe me as a yahoo boy," he says.

They couldn't find anything on him and when he tried to defend himself, claiming he had rights, one of the police officers slapped him. "I fell to the ground sobbing but they dragged me by the waist and took me to their van where they collected everything including my phone and the 8,000 Naira I was with."

Luckily for Tobe, they let him go free after 2 hours. "They set me free because they caught another pack of boys who were in a Venza car, but they didn't give me my money completely, they gave me 2,000 Naira for my transport," he says.

It's no news that thousands of Nigerian youth have witnessed incidents like Tobe's — many more worse than his. It's this helpless and seemingly unsolvable situation which prompted the #EndSARS protests. Sparked after a viral video of a man who was shot just because he was driving an SUV and was mistaken as a yahoo boy, the #EndSARS protests saw millions of young Nigerians across several states of the country come out of their homes and march against a system has killed unfathomable numbers of people for invalid or plain stupid reasons. The protests started on October 6th, 2020 and came to a seize after a tragedy struck on October 20th of the same year.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Meet Uyi Omorogbe: TikTok's Resident Menace and Founder of Clothing Brand NASO

We spoke with the viral 'Annoying My African Parents' creator about online success and his upcoming brand collab with Converse.