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Listen to Our Premiere of Sirens of Lesbos' Fresh New Single 'We'll Be Fine'

"We'll Be Fine" will get you hooked to Sirens of Lesbos' eclectic music and good vibes.

Swiss born Sudanese-Eritrean sisters, Jasmina and Nabyla Serag, along with Arci Friede, Melvyn Buss and art director Denise Haeberli, are launching a diverse and fresh label named after their band, Sirens of Lesbos.

The group christens the label with its new single, "We'll Be Fine," a soulful melodic pop experience that incorporates reggae beats with compelling lyrics that will induce island feels.


"We'll Be Fine" art work.

As the Serag sisters put it, "We'll Be Fine' is a breakup story that will end happily—in this life or a next one. We tried to find a sound formula that would reflect that strange limbo state between sadness and confidence."

The group's sound is an infusion of '60s and '70s pop and soul, blues. The artists' backgrounds in hip-hop, pop, Caribbean, Ibiza, and Western music occasionally involuntarily bleeds into their music. The Serag sisters gave us insight to their creative process:

"We don't write and produce music with the idea of injecting our ethnic background into it—it can happen or not...the last thing we want to be is a cliché. It is a fact, however, that we are the children of Eritrean-Sudanese parents; we grew up listening to popular Afro-Arab music of the '50s, '60s and '70s...Their music was poetic, often sad but basically full of hope. This melodramatic vibe flowed into "We'll Be Fine" even though the musical references in the song recall more Caribbean and Western than East African sounds."

Sirens of Lesbos.

If "We'll Be Fine" is any indication for what's to come, we'll be keeping our eyes on future albums from the group.

"We'll Be Fine" will be launched with the label, June 4. You can listen to the premiere of the single below.

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EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP via Getty Images.

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Sudanese women chant slogans during a demonstration demanding a civilian body to lead the transition to democracy, outside the army headquarters in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on April 12, 2019. - Sudanese protestors vowed on April 12 to chase out the country's new military rulers, as the army offered talks on forming a civilian government after it ousted president Omar al-Bashir. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

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C Natty/emPawa

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South African Hip-Hop Producers Tweezy and Gemini Major Set for Instagram Live Beat Battle

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After Instagram live beat battles such as Swizz Beatz versus Timbaland and Mannie Fresh versus Scott Storch amid the lockdown to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus, it was only a matter of time until the hip-hop community across the world followed suit.

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