Photos

Nigerian Photographer William Ukoh's 'Whiteshadows' Series

Fashion photographer William Ukoh shares perspective on cultural appropriation in 'Whiteshadows' collection

In one of his latest series, Nigerian photographer William Ukoh takes a detour from his usual fashion pieces and explores cultural appropriation in Whiteshadows. Based in Toronto, Ukoh was influenced by his mother's art collections and began drawing before settling on photography as his main medium. We've previously seen his work with several fashion outlets including fellow Canadian-based designer Andrea Iyamah in her Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook.


In an interview with Yagazie Emezi, Ukoh explains that "'Whiteshadows I' is an ongoing series from an ongoing discussion about cultural appropriation — and the much hidden discussion about taking ownership – told from [his] perspective. The collection of photos in their presentation is as vague as the term //cultural appropriation// and as clear as the perceived term //cultural appropriation//"

Using mostly black-and-white images, the self-taught photographer captures male model Stone Rulier in an arrangement of angular and wiry poses. Ukoh also recently completed a project called Something to Do, a series of vibrant photographs capturing the entrepreneurial spirit of street vendors and traders in Lagos, Nigeria. View his Whiteshadows collection in the gallery above. Find out more about Ukoh's work in his extended interview with Yagazie Emezi and follow him on TumblrInstagram, and Facebook.

Spotlight
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.