Photos

Nigerian Photographer William Ukoh's 'Whiteshadows' Series

Fashion photographer William Ukoh shares perspective on cultural appropriation in 'Whiteshadows' collection

In one of his latest series, Nigerian photographer William Ukoh takes a detour from his usual fashion pieces and explores cultural appropriation in Whiteshadows. Based in Toronto, Ukoh was influenced by his mother's art collections and began drawing before settling on photography as his main medium. We've previously seen his work with several fashion outlets including fellow Canadian-based designer Andrea Iyamah in her Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook.


In an interview with Yagazie Emezi, Ukoh explains that "'Whiteshadows I' is an ongoing series from an ongoing discussion about cultural appropriation — and the much hidden discussion about taking ownership – told from [his] perspective. The collection of photos in their presentation is as vague as the term //cultural appropriation// and as clear as the perceived term //cultural appropriation//"

Using mostly black-and-white images, the self-taught photographer captures male model Stone Rulier in an arrangement of angular and wiry poses. Ukoh also recently completed a project called Something to Do, a series of vibrant photographs capturing the entrepreneurial spirit of street vendors and traders in Lagos, Nigeria. View his Whiteshadows collection in the gallery above. Find out more about Ukoh's work in his extended interview with Yagazie Emezi and follow him on TumblrInstagram, and Facebook.

Popular
Photo: Courtesy of Saphir Niakadie

Meet Four Women Pushing Ivorian Art Forward Through Photography

These young and emerging female photographers from Côte d'Ivoire are shaking up Abidjan's art scene.

There's been a tremendous amount of awe-inspiring art coming from the African continent lately. Photography is no exception. It is one of the most powerful tools used in changing the way in which the West perceives Africa and its diaspora and perhaps the reason why contemporary photography is thriving.

The female gaze is paramount to the way in which the aforementioned visual stories are told and the female photographers here are using their camera lenses to give us glimpses of lands, peoples, histories, and futures unknown. Their individual experiences and perspectives are widening the scope of what is believed to be Côte d'Ivoire. Within the country's capital, Abidjan, there's a creative scene that seems to have sprawled up out of nowhere yet is so rich in its offerings.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Meet Nigeria’s All-Female Bikers Club, Featured In Darey's Latest Video

Darey collaborates with all-female bike riders to reimagine a pandemic-free world in the new video for "Jojo."