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CROYDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 01: Wizkid performs on stage on Day 2 at The Ends festival at Lloyd Park on May 31, 2019 in Croydon, England.

Listen to Wizkid's 'Made In Lagos' Interview with Apple Music

Wizkid speaks on Apple Music's 'The Zane Lowe Show' about artistic growth, being an old soul and working with Damian Marley and Ella Mai on his latest album, 'Made In Lagos'.

Wizkid has revealed deep insights in his latest interview on Apple Music's The Zane Lowe Show. The Afrobeats star reflects on the success of his latest album Made In Lagos which dropped in October of 2019. The interview with famed DJ and radio host Zane Lowe is a musical musing on collaborations, resilience, lessons learnt from the COVID-19 lockdown and artistic growth. The dialogue forecasts Wizkid's current music-making for a post-pandemic era.


Read: Wizkid Releases Highly-Anticipated 'Made in Lagos' Album

Wizkid has reportedly called the resounding success of Made in Lagos a "blessing". According to Botswana Unplugged, he said that he's thankful for the global positive reception. When the 14-track album dropped, The Source called him a "musical titan" who has the ability dominate unfamiliar music markets. The powerful album proves this with features from fellow Nigerian star Burna Boy, American singers Ella Mai and H.E.R as well as Jamaican artists Damian Marley and Projexx. When asked about the collaborations, Wizkid does not hold back:

"You know, first of all, like when two artists go in the room to make music, especially two great artists, you definitely going to create magic. But when you have like two real people or like three real people in the room that you're bound to make, even like exceptional music. So me getting in the room with Projexx, Damian Marley Ella Mai, everyone that I made music with. I just wanted to make sure I'm making music. I'm not making music for the name or just cause the name looks nice together."

The 30-year-old father reflects on how the COVID-19 lockdown broke the illusion of touring, stating that it's easy to get stuck in the distorted reality of that world. He also laments the loss of performing live and the energy exchange which he used to receive from audiences. The lockdown has in effect, sobered him up and invariably led to a new drive for making music. "So right now it's like, I'm making some of the most purest, realist music I've ever made in life", he says to Lowe on the show.

While he's known for upbeat dance music, Wizkid revealed that he has always connected more with older people and that he is more at peace as he grows older. The artist coolly expressed that he does not think too much about the music he is making for the future because it comes from a real place. Staying true to himself is part of his brand.

Listen to the full interview here once uploaded on Apple Music's The Zane Lowe Show.

Listen to Made In Lagos on Spotify:

Listen to Made In Lagos on Apple Music:

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Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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