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43 World Health Organisation Experts To Land in South Africa as Coronavirus Infection Rates Peak

South Africa receives help from WHO experts who are flying into the country to help combat possible second spike of infections.

Health Minister Dr. Zweli Mkhize has announced that a rescue team of 43 WHO pandemic experts will arrive in South Africa. Coronavirus infection rates in the country have reached over half a million with deaths almost at 10 000. The announcement comes in the wake of ongoing investigations of a PPE corruption scandal that implicates government officials. Health workers are at a higher risk of contracting the virus due to shortage of crucial PPE that is used to prevent the transmission from patients.


Read: South Africans Are Not Impressed by Government's Second Wave of Artist Relief Fund

The first batch of 17 experts will land in South Africa by Wednesday and will complete a 14-day period of quarantine and initiation before being deployed within the department across various provinces. Renowned specialists Dr David Heymann (a seasoned infectious disease epidemiologist and public health expert) and Dr Mike Ryan will lead infection mitigation efforts by the international body.

This is the latest government effort in curbing high infection rates and a possible second surge of coronavirus infections which has hit health workers most invariably with 24 000 infected and 181 dead according to South Africa's Department of Health. Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal were coronavirus hotspots but a decline has been recorded in the first two provinces whereas in KwaZulu-Natal infection rates continue to rise.

Mkhize has been calmly steering public health responses since initial cases of coronavirus were recorded. He has stated that South Africa has passed public health experts' predicted peak, but with the country experiencing the last month of winter, he has urged the public to continue practicing social distancing.

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Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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