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Yasiin Bey Permitted to Leave South Africa

Yasiin Bey, f.k.a. Mos Def, is finally allowed to leave South Africa following a successful apology to the Home Affairs Department.

Ten months since his legal woes began, Yasiin Bey, the artist formerly known as Mos Def, is now permitted to leave South Africa. Bey, whose legal name is Dante Terrell Smith, will leave the country Tuesday evening following a written apology to Home Affairs, which the department has accepted.


"[He] has unreservedly apologized to the Government of South Africa," Home Affairs explained in a statement. "The department is satisfied with the apology [and] will withdraw the charges against him."

Bey was arrested in January while attempting to leave South Africa using a document called a “world passport.” A week later, he revealed his plans to retire from music and acting at the end of the year and put out his final album. And while there’s still no word on a release date for the final album he promised, Bey has been using his time in Cape Town to record and release a steady stream of new tracks alongside his longtime collaborator and A Country Called Earth co-founder, Ferrari Sheppard, under their Dec. 99th moniker.

He confirmed his impending retirement last month, calling 2016 his “retirement party year.”

2016 may also be Bey's actual final party in S.A. Having been declared an “undesirable person” in terms of Section 30 of South Africa’s Immigration Act, he will not qualify for re-entry or admission to South Africa in the future, Home Affairs said in a statement. He may however apply for a waiver, for good cause, in terms of Section 2 of the Immigration Act of 2002.

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Photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A Year After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Maintain That Nothing Has Changed

Despite the disbandment of the SARS units, young Nigerians are still being treated as criminals. We talk to several of them about their experiences since the #EndSARS protests.

On September 12th, Tobe, a 22-year-old student at the University of Nigeria's Enugu Campus was on his way to Shoprite to hang out with his friends when the tricycle he had boarded was stopped by policemen. At first, Tobe thought they were about to check the driver's documents, but he was wrong. "An officer told me to come down, he started searching me like I was a criminal and told me to pull down my trousers, I was so scared that my mind was racing in different ways, I wasn't wearing anything flashy nor did I have an iPhone or dreads — things they would use to describe me as a yahoo boy," he says.

They couldn't find anything on him and when he tried to defend himself, claiming he had rights, one of the police officers slapped him. "I fell to the ground sobbing but they dragged me by the waist and took me to their van where they collected everything including my phone and the 8,000 Naira I was with."

Luckily for Tobe, they let him go free after 2 hours. "They set me free because they caught another pack of boys who were in a Venza car, but they didn't give me my money completely, they gave me 2,000 Naira for my transport," he says.

It's no news that thousands of Nigerian youth have witnessed incidents like Tobe's — many more worse than his. It's this helpless and seemingly unsolvable situation which prompted the #EndSARS protests. Sparked after a viral video of a man who was shot just because he was driving an SUV and was mistaken as a yahoo boy, the #EndSARS protests saw millions of young Nigerians across several states of the country come out of their homes and march against a system has killed unfathomable numbers of people for invalid or plain stupid reasons. The protests started on October 6th, 2020 and came to a seize after a tragedy struck on October 20th of the same year.

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