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Yemi Alade Has Cupid 'Taking Over Me' In New Visuals Featuring Phyno

Yemi Alade releases the dance-heavy visuals to her video for "Taking Over Me" featuring Phyno.


Yemi Alade is back alongside Igbo MC Phyno with the visuals to her fourth King of Queens single "Taking Over Me." The latest video from the Nigerian songstress follows her huge, hip-shaking singles from last summer "Johnny" and "Tangerine," which both featured production work from Triple MG's Selebobo. For "Taking Over You," Alade tapped producer GospelOnDeBeatz, who adds a continuous pulse to the singer's vocal melodies and Phyno's bars, playing with uptempo breakbeats and flirtatious rhythms. Directed by  Taiye Aliyu Justin Campos, the visuals take lyrical cues from the upbeat tone and style of the track. They feature Alade in dance and costume-heavy skits (complete with a belly dancing number) while she and Phyno, in matching prints, muse on their respective lovers' cupid-like chokehold. Watch Yemi Alade's video for "Taking Over Me," shot in South Africa and Nigeria, below and listen to her mash-up version of "Johnny" in Teck-Zilla's Afro Bootleg EP.

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(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images for Disney)

Check Out the Trailer for Beyoncé's Upcoming Documentary 'Making the Gift'

The ABC special will offer a behind the scenes look at the making of the album "The Lion King: The Gift" and features Burna Boy, Yemi Alade and more.

Beyoncé is set to take fans inside the making of her latest album The Lion King: The Gift, with the upcoming ABC special Making the Gift, a documentary that chronicles the process of producing the album which she described as "a love letter to Africa."

The announcement came yesterday, when ABC shared the trailer of the special on their social media, even changing their Twitter name to "ABeyC" to mark the occasion. Beyoncé also shared the clip on Instagram—the surprise announcement has unsurprisingly spurred excited reactions from fans online.

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Still from YouTube

Watch Yemi Alade's New Short Film for Her Latest Single 'Home'

Yemi Alade plays a young woman longing to be reunited with the love of her life in the Clarence Peters-directed short.

Following the release of her album, Woman of Steel last week, Yemi Alade has released a music video and now a short film for her lead single "Home."

The emotional short follows a tortured love story between Yemi, who plays Nneka in the film and her lover Austine (played by Frankincense Eche-Ben). She has to escape an abusive grandmother and a mundane life in rural Nigeria in order to be reunited with him, in the hopes that they can run away together and live a better life.

READ: Yemi Alade's Journey to Becoming a Woman of Steel

The film also includes a colorful performance of "Home" in between footage of Nneka's journey to meet Austine.

The short film was written and directed by frequent collaborator Clarence Peters, who also directed the film's original music video.

"Home" is one of the singles that the artist dropped ahead of the release of Woman of Steel, along with "Give Dem" and the dance banger "Bounce." OkayAfrica spoke with the artist ahead of the albums release and she shared the overall theme of her latest work. "Woman of Steel is all about drawing the inner strength that you have in you and being the superhero that you've always needed," said Alade.

As the "Nigerian Queen of Music Videos," it only make sense that the artist would take things to the next level by producing a short film. Revisit our recent profile on the artist, and check out the "Home" short film down below.

Yemi Alade - Home (The Movie) Starring Clarion Chukwura & Frankincense Eche-Ben youtu.be

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Photo by Hamish Brown

In Conversation: Lemn Sissay On His New Book About Re-claiming the Ethiopian Heritage Stolen From Him by England’s Foster Care System

In 'My Name Is Why,' the 2019 PEN Pinter award winner passionately advocates for children in the institutional care system, and in turn tells a unique story of identity and the power in discovering one's heritage.

It took the author Lemn Sissay almost two decades to learn his real name. As an Ethiopian child growing up in England's care system, his cultural identity was systematically stripped from him at an early age. "For the first 18 years of my life I thought that my name was Norman," Sissay tells OkayAfrica. "I didn't meet a person of color until I was 10 years of age. I didn't know a person of color until I was 16. I didn't know I was Ethiopian until I was 16 years of age. They stole the memory of me from me. That is a land grab, you know? That is post-colonial, hallucinatory madness."

Sissay was not alone in this experience. As he notes in his powerful new memoir My Name Is Why, during the 1960s, tens of thousands of children in the UK were taken from their parents under dubious circumstances and put up for adoption. Sometimes, these placements were a matter of need, but other times, as was the case with Sissay, it was a result of the system preying on vulnerable parents. His case records, which he obtained in 2015 after a hardfought 30 year campaign, show that his mother was a victim of child "harvesting," in which young, single women were often forced into giving their children up for adoption before being sent back to their native countries. She tried to regain custody of young Sissay, but was unsuccessful.

Whether they end up in the foster system out of need or by mistake, Sissay says that most institutionalized children face the same fate of abuse under an inadequate and mismanaged system that fails to recognize their full humanity. For black children who are sent to white homes, it often means detachment from a culturally-sensitive environment. "There are too many brilliant people that I know who have been adopted by white parents for me to say that it just doesn't work," says Sissay. "But the problem is the amount of children that it doesn't work for."

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(Screenshot from "Every Woman" video)

Check out Cameroonian Crooner Vagabon’s New Ode to Female Power

The singer dropped a video for new single "Every Woman" today, shot by fellow Cameroonian director Lino Asana.

Cameroonian-born singer-songwriter Laetitia Tamko, better known as her stage name Vagabon, has been spoiling us with delights as of late. First, the crooner teased us with two singles, "Flood" and "Water Me Down" from her forthcoming sophomore album, Vagabon, a work she wrote and produced herself. And today, she surprised us with a new single and video for "Every Woman"—a track Tamko claims is the "thesis of the album," as per a press statement reported by The Fader magazine

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