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Yvonne Orji Discusses Her Parents' Reaction to 'Racy' Episodes of 'Insecure' & More With Stephen Colbert

The Nigerian actress also talks her knack for dancing, and getting career advice from the Holy Spirit.

Insecure star Yvonne Orji made her first late night appearance last night on the Late Show With Stephen Colbert.

The actress made an energetic entrance as her and Colbert exchanged dance moves before sitting down to talk about how she got her start in comedy, getting career advice from the "Holy Spirit," and shooting "racy" Insecure scenes.


When Colbert asks how Orji's conservative Nigerian parents feel about watching her in the show, the actress reveals how she thought her parents—who were living at Nigeria at the time—would never see the show, but it eventually premiered in Nigeria and an "aunt" ended up telling them when and where to watch it. "I was like, who is this aunt that keeps calling you and ruining my life," she joked.

Thankfully, it seems like her parents are fans of the show. "Now they faithfully sit down to watch it but, you know....I get them good gifts on their birthdays."

Watch the humorous interview down below. You can catch Orji starring as Molly on Insecure on HBO.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.