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Zimbabwean Scholar Tererai Trent to Have Statue Erected In Her Honor in NYC

The academic has been named one of the "10 most inspiring women in the world" for her dedication to championing gender equality.

Zimbabwean-born scholar, humanitarian and author Tererai Trent has dedicated her life to promoting equal rights for girls and women, and now she's being recingized for it in a major way. The academic will have a statue erected in her honor at the Rockefeller Centre in New York City on August 26, as part of an initiative called "Statues for Equality."

The academic will be honored alongside the likes of Oprah Winfrey, Janet Mock, Gabby Douglas, Pink, and others.


Trent was born in the Zvipani, a rural village in Zimbabwe in 1965, where she was unable to attend her local school on account of her family's financial status and her gender, according to Zimbabwean paper The Herald. She aspired to one day attend college in the US and go on to get her masters and PhD. With her mother's encouragement, she wrote these dreams down, placed them in a tin can and buried them.

She achieved her dream later in life when she moved to Oklahoma with her husband and five children in 1998 and earned her bachelors in agricultural education in 2001 and a masters in 2003, before going on to complete her PhD at Western Michigan University in 2009. That same year, she founded Tererai Trent International, which promotes education and helps build schools in her home country. She appeared on the "Oprah Winfrey Show" twice for her work, and the mogul has described Trent as her "All-time favorite guest," as Face 2 Face Africa notes. Winfrey granted Trent 1.5 million to rebuild an elementary school in her hometown.

Trent has authored multiple books, including the children's book, The Girl who Buried her Dreams in a Can, about her life as well as the self-help book The Awakened Woman: Remembering & Igniting Our Sacred Dreams (2017), which won an NCAAP award for Outstanding Literary Work. The book includes a forward by Oprah Winfrey, who said: "If you've ever looked at the world and felt an aching for one of its many hurts or injustices, this book is for you. If you know the power of sisterhood or need to know its power, this book is for you."

The academic shared the exciting news on Twitter, writing "I am incredibly honored to be standing among the World's Top 10 Most Inspiring Women 'Sculpted for Equal Rights. Come August 26 and celebrate the empowerment of women and big dreams!"

Stormzy performs during The BRIT Awards 2020 at The O2 Arena. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage) via Getty Images.

Watch Stormzy's Powerful BRIT Awards Performance Featuring Burna Boy

The night saw the British-Ghanaian star run through a medley of songs from his latest album, Heavy Is the Head.

The BRIT Awards 2020, which went down earlier this week, saw the likes of Stormzy take home the Best Male trophy home and Dave win Best Album.

The night also saw Stormzy deliver a stunning performance that featured a medley of songs from his latest album, Heavy Is the Head. The British-Ghanaian star started things out slow with "Don't Forget to Breathe," before popping things off with "Do Better" then turning up the heat with "Wiley Flow."

Stormzy nodded to J Hus, playing a short bit of "Fortune Teller," before being joined onstage by Nigeria's Burna Boy to perform their hit "Own It." Burna Boy got his own moment and performed an energetic rendition of his African Giant favorite "Anybody."

The night was closed off with a powerful message that read: "A lot of time they tell us 'Black people, we too loud.' Know what I'm sayin'? We need to turn it down a little bit. We seem too arrogant. We a little too much for them to handle. Black is beautiful man." The message flashed on a black screen before a moving performance of "Rainfall" backed by his posse.

Watch the full performance below.

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The ornate gilded copper headgear, which features images of Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, was unearthed after refugee-turned-Dutch-citizen Sirak Asfaw contacted Dutch 'art detective' Arthur Brand. (Photo by Jan HENNOP/AFP) (Photo by JAN HENNOP/AFP via Getty Images)

A Stolen 18th Century Ethiopian Crown Has Been Returned from The Netherlands

The crown had been hidden in a Dutch apartment for 20 years.

In one of the latest developments around art repatriation, a stolen 18th century Ethiopian crown that was discovered decades ago in the Netherlands, has been sent back home.

Sirak Asfaw, an Ethiopian who fled to The Netherlands in the '70s, first found the relic in the suitcase of a visitor in 1998, reports BBC Africa. He reportedly protected the item for two decades, before informing Dutch "art crime investigator" Arthur Brand and authorities about his discovery last year.

The crown is one of only 20 in existence and features intricate Biblical depictions of Jesus, God and the Holy Spirit. Historians believe it was given to the church by the warlord Welde Sellase several centuries ago.

Read: Bringing African Artifacts Home

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Still from Youtube.

Watch Samba Yonga's Kick-Ass TED Talk on an 'African Superhero Curriculum'

The co-founder of the Zambian Women's History Museum speaks about the importance of indigenous knowledge in creating Africa's own superheroes.

Co-founder of the Zambian Women's History Museum, Samba Yonga, is on a mission to reclaim Africa's history and indigenous knowledge in a way that allows Africans to centre themselves in their own narratives and become their own superheroes.

She recently spoke at TEDxLusaka about developing a "blueprint for the African superhero curriculum". It's the TED talk that you definitely need to watch this year.

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