Video

Video: This Poem Celebrates the Undying Magic of the Black Woman

OkayAfrica connects with Ghanaian-American poet Cynthia Amoah for a powerful spoken word video.

Back in March, we stumbled on Ghanaian-American poet Cynthia Amoah's powerful poem that encouraged black girls to love the skin they're in.

We had to connect with the wordsmith, where she delivered another strong prose that celebrates the undying magic, resilience, and wonder of the black woman.

Listen and watch The Undying below.

Credits

Talent: Raphaelle Efoui Delplanque, Alisha Acquaye, Monzurat Oni, Soleita Kabwasa, Esther Akinwande, Gaciru Matathia, Gina Sagaponack, Oriane Adjibi, Eunice Apia

Producer: Chika Okoli

Assistant Producer: Ginny Suss

Videographer/Editor: Greg Poole

popular

My Breasts Are Not Inappropriate: Fighting Google Censorship

An online video company called out Google for flagging videos of bare-breasted women taking part in the Swazi Reed Dance and it worked

An online media company whose mission is to 'preserve and restore African values, dignity and pride through film' recently had its YouTube channel flagged by Google for its video footage of bare-breasted women in a traditional Swazi and Zulu event known as the the Reed Dance Ceremony.

But the company, TV Yabantu did not take the censorship without a fight.

Last week, Lazi Dlamini, the head of TV Yabantu, began organizing protests. He reached out to more than 200 cultural groups in Swaziland to join forces in a campaign to protest what he deemed to be an attack on his culture.

"We don't care about the revenues, we care about the insult to our culture," Dlamini told South Africa's Mail and Guardian.

Three days ago, TV Yabantu released the first of a three part series called "Google Racist Exposed." The videos, all of which have been released, begin with a message to viewers. In bold red letters printed on a black screen, the message begins, "We have not been posting our videos because we are under attack by Google." The message goes on to ask viewers to help them "fight racism and abuse against African women by Google, Facebook, and Instagram." It then accuses the companies of upholding "apartheid racist policies" against African women.

At least a dozen women showed up bare-breasted on a rainy afternoon in Durban carrying protest signs for the first demonstration last Saturday. "Facebook stop deleting our pictures," one sign said, shedding light on the fact that Google isn't the only offender.

Before Google began flagging the TV Yabantu content as "inappropriate for some audiences" and "inappropriate for advertisers," their YouTube channel had 3000-4000 new subscribers per month, according to BBC Africa.

The inappropriate flags may have affected up to 50 videos, stated Dlamini.

But the protests proved effective. Google, which owns YouTube, has removed the flags.

"It was not [Google's] policy to restrict nudity in such instances where it is culturally or traditionally appropriate," a representative from Google told South Africa's The Mail and Guardian.

Dlamini organized the protests only after he contacted Google defending the content's cultural significance, and the company maintained that the videos were in violation of the platform's standards.

See parts two and three below:




Politics

Is George Weah President of Liberia Yet?

The former FIFA World Player of the Year is the frontrunner in the Liberian elections which took place Tuesday.

While social media is awash in rumors that international football star George Weah has won the Liberian presidency, there has not, at time of writing been any official announcement from Liberia's National Election Commission. In fact, it is highly unlikely, given the huge field of candidates for this year's vote, that any candidate was able to get 50 percent of the vote needed to become president—a result that would prompt a runoff election for later this month.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.