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African AF: Our Favorite Artists and Visionaries Wearing OkayAfrica Merch

A gallery of some of our favorite people, wearing OkayAfrica merchandise with style.

DIASPORA—OkayAfrica released its first homegrown line AFRICAN AF last month, and the response has been major.


The line was created out of one inherent desire: to proudly show where we’re from and what we love. Many of you have taken to social media to show your #AfricanAF style in some of our new merchandise, and we love it.

Below, we highlight some of the movers and shakers in our space who have rocked merchandise from both our past and most current lines, with style.

Revisit our lookbook and stay connected via the OkayAfrica shop Instagram page.

Ladipoe in our classic, black and white OkayAfrica tee.

Imany, performing in the bold "Immigrant Tee."

Pops Mensah-bonsu in our "Leaders Tee," and Stanley Lumax in our "GHANA Me Tee."

Tech maven, Jessica O. Matthews in our "Naija No Day Carry Last."  

Luvvie Ajayi in the "I Don't Speak African Tee." 

Googling. Shirt from @okayafrica's new collection.

A post shared by Awesomely Luvvie (@luvvie) on

DJ Lag in our "Okayafrica x Daniel Ting Chong Chest Print T-Shirt."

One of our favorite fitness coaches Scott Bernard, rocking out "Naija No Dey Carry Last Tee."

Afrobeats artists Ycee rocking the "OkayAfrica x Daniel Ting Chong Chest Print T-Shirt."

DJ Spinall also sporting the "OkayAfrica x Daniel Ting Chong Chest T-Shirt" during his visit to NYC.

Ugo Mozie in the "Okayafrica x Daniel Ting Chong Crewneck Sweatshirt."

🌍 @okayafrica

A post shared by Chief Ugo Mozie II (@ugomozie) on

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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