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Namibia's Black Vulcanite Sans Hip Hop's Bravado

Namibia's Black Vulcanite have set African Hip Hop's new standard of consciousness. Check out their new EP Remember the Future here.


Mark Mushiva (Mark Question), Allain Villet (aliTHATdude) and Nikolai Tjongarero (Okin), also known as Black Vulcanite, are Namibia's latest export. Recently they've vacillated between their home base of Windhoek, and Cape Town, South Africa, to push the launch of their latest EP Remember The Future. One hell of an EP, these dudes brought it together extremely well, featuring UK’s Jay Prince and pristine Swiss beatmaker Maloon the Boom, as well as Cape Town's Youngsta, to name but a few. The musical ‘amuse bouches’ like "This Is How I Feel", peppered around the EP, strike the perfect balance of character and consciousness, while the heady and very chill "Check It Out" shows us exactly what the trio's philosophy entails: “no necklaces, chains, or bad bitches,” they thrive on their love of hip hop, pride in their Africanness, and dedication to remembering one's place in this mortal realm...

*Stream Black Vulcanite "Drinking Life" feat. Youngsta below

Recently signed to Rude World Records, they’ve created a new standard for African hip hop to reach, using the ultimate trifecta for great sound and ingenuity: perfectly honed skill, quality, evocative beats, and a humble approach to their music, sans the bravado one would come to expect from the hip hop genre. Describing the difficulties of life, politics, and creativity with finesse and insight while making reference to Star Trek and Transformers is no easy feat; If Milo’s Things That Happen In The Day/Night was of any interest to you, these guys and their affinity for all things 'geek culture' is quirky and fresh. aliTHATdude describes his feelings on the day they signed to Rude World as such:

‘Man, we were all just chilling smoking a doobie and having a beer, recording the track "Check it Out," until Rudi walked in with the contract and we all just looked at each other and laughed! We knew this was it yo... The feeling of just, “FINALLY, we’re here now.” That's what I was thinking at the time we signed. We were so thankful for all the support we got from Rude world, to our families and friends back in Nam... finally, we signed, purely for the love of music.’

With the finished album available and making waves everywhere, keep an ear to the ground for more from Black Vulcanite; rumours of an upcoming music video on the cards have surfaced and we can’t wait to see the result... Check out the video below by Dylan Valley of their most recent trip to Cape Town at Smith & Abrahams General Dealers.

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Introducing OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 List

Celebrating African Women Laying the Groundwork for the Future

It would not be hyperbole to consider the individuals we're honoring for OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 list as architects of the future.

This is to say that these women are building infrastructure, both literally and metaphorically, for future generations in Africa and in the Diaspora. And they are doing so intentionally, reaching back, laterally, and forward to bridge gaps and make sure the steps they built—and not without hard work, mines of microaggressions, and challenges—are sturdy enough for the next ascent.

In short, the women on this year's list are laying the groundwork for other women to follow. It's what late author and American novelist Toni Morrison would call your "real job."

"I tell my students, 'When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else."

And that's what inspired us in the curation of this year's list. Our honorees use various mediums to get the job done—DJ's, fashion designers, historians, anthropologists, and even venture capitalists—but each with the mission to clear the road ahead for generations to come. Incredible African women like Eden Ghebreselassie, a marketing lead at ESPN who created a non-profit to fight energy poverty in Eritrea; or Baratang Miya, who is quite literally building technology clubs for disadvantaged youth in South Africa.

There are the builds that aren't physically tangible—movements that inspire women to show up confidently in their skin, like Enam Asiama's quest to normalize plus-sized bodies and Frédérique (Freddie) Harrel's push for Black and African women to embrace the kink and curl of their hair.

And then there are those who use their words to build power, to take control of the narrative, and to usher in true inclusion and equity. Journalists, (sisters Nikki and Lola Ogunnaike), a novelist (Oyinkan Braithwaite), a media maven (Yolisa Phahle), and a number of historians (Nana Oforiatta Ayim, Leïla Sy) to name a few.

In a time of uncertainty in the world, there's assuredness in the mission to bring up our people. We know this moment of global challenge won't last. It is why we are moving forward to share this labor of love with you, our trusted and loyal audience. We hope that this list serves as a beacon for you during this moment—insurance that future generations will be alright. And we have our honorees to thank for securing that future.

EXPERIENCE 100 WOMEN 2020

The annual OkayAfrica 100 Women List is our effort to acknowledge and uplift African women, not only as a resource that has and will continue to enrich the world we live in, but as a group that deserves to be recognized, reinforced and treasured on a global scale. In the spirit of building infrastructure, this year's list will go beyond the month of March (Women's History Month in America) and close in September during Women's Month in South Africa.

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Burna Boy 'African Giant' money cover art by Sajjad.

The 20 Essential Burna Boy Songs

We comb through the Nigerian star's hit-filled discography to select 20 essential songs from the African Giant.

Since bursting onto the scene in 2012 with his chart-topping single, "Like to Party," and the subsequent release of his debut album, L.I.F.E - Leaving an Impact for eternity, Burna Boy has continued to prove time and again that he is a force to be reckoned with.

The African Giant has, over the years, built a remarkable musical identity around the ardent blend of dancehall, hip-hop, reggae, R&B, and afropop to create a game-changing genre he calls afro-fusion. The result has been top tier singles, phenomenal collaborations, and global stardom—with several accolades under his belt which include a Grammy nomination and African Giant earning a spot on many publications' best albums of 2019.

We thought to delve into his hit-filled discography to bring you The 20 Essential Burna Boy Songs.

This list is in no particular order.

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Photo courtesy of Upile Chisala.

Join Upile Chisala For Soothing Readings of Her Latest Works

Malawian poet Upile Chisala is set to deliver readings from her three poetry collections on Instagram Live.

Malawian poet Upile Chisala is set to deliver readings of her latest works of poetry on Instagram Live this week.

On the 8th of April, she'll be hosting a session where she'll read from her first two works Soft Magic and Nectar while the session on the 9th of April will include a reading from her latest work titled A Fire Like You. Both sessions will take place at 8 PM (SAST).

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Interview
Justice Mukheli. Courtesy of Black Major/Bongeziwe Mabandla.

Interview: Bongeziwe Mabandla's New Album Is a Calm Meditation On Relationships

We speak with the South African artist about his captivating new album, iimini, love cycles, and the unexpected influence of Bon Iver.

"I've been playing at home for so many years and pretending to be having shows in my living room, and today it's actually happening," Bongeziwe Mabandla says, smiling out at me from my cellphone as I watch him play songs on Instagram Live, guitar close to his chest.

Two weekends ago, Mabandla was meant to be celebrating the release of his third album, iimini, at the Untitled Basement in Braamfontein in Joburg, which would no doubt have been packed with some of the many fans the musician has made since his debut release, Umlilo, in 2012. With South Africa joining many other parts of the world in a lockdown, those dates were cancelled and Mabandla, like many other artists, took to social media to still play some tracks from the album. The songs on iimini are about the life and death of a relationship—songs that are finding their way into the hearts of fans around the world, some of whom, now stuck in isolation, may be having to confront the ups and downs of love, with nowhere to hide.

The day before his Instagram Live mini-show, Mabandla spoke to OkayAfrica on lockdown from his home in Newtown about the lessons he's learned from making the album, his new-found love for Bon Iver, and how he's going to be spending his time over the next few weeks.

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