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9 Videos/Tracks You Might've Missed

Watch and hear 9 standout tracks/video from D'banj, Alekesam, Wizkid, Boddhi Satva, Sarkodie and more!


The holidays are that rare (and blissful) time of the year when we get to put down our phones, ignore twitter feeds, and let our google reader pile up for days without checking it. We assume some of you might've done the same. To round up what we might've missed here's some highlight tracks, mixes and videos that dropped over the holiday from Alekesam, D'banj, Xtatic, Papa Ghana, Sarkodie, Wizkid, DJ Satelite and others.

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1. Sal Masekela, Bra Hugh's son (and previous X-Games host), drops a video for his reverb drenched R'n'B project Alekesam's latest single "Summer Jams."

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2. The Koko Master D'banj plays a high-stakes game of poker in "Cashflow."

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3. Kenya's hardest spitter (male or female) Xtatic is joined by SA rapper AKA and Priddy Ugly in this black-and-white banger.

[embed width="600"][/embed]

4. Naija boy Wizkid releases a video for the ultra-catchy fan-dedicated track "Thank You."

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5. Sarkodie flexes his flow in the uplifter jam "Hallelujah" featuring Viviane Chidid.

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6. Central African Republic producer Boddhi Satva drops visuals for "Nankoumandjan." feautring vocals from Mangala Camara.

7. Angola's DJ Satelite releases the third installment in the always-incredible Luanda No Horizonte mixes.

8. Cumbia producers Copia Doble Systema remix The Very Best.

9. Papa Ghana drops the dark-electronic dub "DVMSKO" off his upcoming debut Mandingo EP.

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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