News Brief

Four African Paralympians Ran the 1500 Meters Faster Than Their Able-Bodied Counterparts

Algerian, Kenyan and Ethiopian visually impaired runners outperform Olympians. The Ethiopian crosses fists in solidarity with Oromo protests.

I have to admit that when I heard that four Paralympians just ran the men's 1500 meter faster than the able-bodied Olympians at the Rio games, I assumed it was because of some carbon fibre blade technology à la Oscar Pistorius.


Here's a perfect example of how biases warp perspective. Specifically my biases warping my perspective—the runners were competing in the visually impaired classification.

Nonetheless, they all ran faster than Olympic gold medalist Michael Centrowitz who finished in 3:50. By comparison the fourth placed Paralympian Fouad Baka came in at 3 minutes and 49.59. Baka's brother Abdellatif Baka won gold in a time of 3:48.29.

And one other thing, they're all Africans. Besides the Algerian Brothers, there was the bronze medalist Henry Kirwa from Kenya and silver medalist Tamiru Demisse of Ethiopia.

Demisse also made news at the finish line by crossing his fists above his head—a show of solidarity with Ethiopian anti-government protesters. This echoes his countryman, the marathon runner Feyisa Lelisa, at the Olympics, who is now looking for asylum in the United States after making a similar gesture.

Interview
Supplied

South African Filmmaker Carmen Sangion Unpacks Her Short Film 'Uncertainty'

Uncertainty, a film about a couple's emotional battles during lockdown, forms part of the global nine-chapter anthology project titled One(Nine).

During the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, nine filmmakers isolating in various parts of the world came together for a collective experiment. The global team of female filmmakers worked on short films which formed part of the anthology One(Nine), a nine-chapter project of perspectives and experiences — real, unreal, fiction, non-fiction and everything in between.

The team included Canada's Ingrid Veninger, Mina Shum, Isa Benn and Slater Jewell-Kemker, as well as Dorothee Wenner (Germany), Shengze Zhu (China/USA), Carmen Sangion (South Africa) and Lydia Zimmermann (Spain). One(Nine) premiered digitally at Canada's Female Eye Film Festival that ran from March 12to 29.

For this piece, South Africa's Carmen Sangion dissects Uncertainty, a film which interrogates Black men's vulnerability and mental health struggles through the lens of one couple's relationship battles during lockdown.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

ASAP Shembe’s Remix Edition of His Debut Album ‘Amarekere’ is Essential Listening

ASAP Shembe teams up with producers Daev Martian, KaeB, Buli, Ty Dilla and more for a remix edition of his debut album 'Amarekere'.