News

Africans Make Shoes?!

or those looking for an alternative to the once amazing, now troubling Tom's Shoe Brand we suggest Sawa Shoes and Oliberté Footwear.


While the title may be a joke, these shoemakers are not joking with their "Made in Africa" sartorial pairings for your appendages south of the ankle. For those looking for an alternative to the once amazing, now troubling Tom's Shoe Brand we suggest Sawa Shoes and Oliberté Footwear. Shoes that are not generating charitable slogans or debilitating African economies, these two brands are making fashion that is sustainable...in every sense of the word. 

Made 100% in Africa, Sawa Shoes claims its uniqueness in that it is neither a charity nor a fair trade brand. Sawa is simply a fashion brand that manufactures its products in Africa in order to maintain added value for the continent. As stated on their website, "If one day it were to snow in Africa, would people send us winter coats and snowboards?" Sawa has one thing right, Africans can and will produce their basic necessities and then some into the global market of fashion. And as Sawa braces for a pending snowstorm on the continent (per climate changes) they are certain Africans will be geared shoe-wise for the frosty weather... and snowboarding if they fancy! Check out their collection.

Oliberté Footwear, similarly believes in African countries self-sustaining their socio-economic livelihood, which is why when asked, "Why Africa?" They aptly replied, "Why Not?" Currently producing in Ethiopia, Liberia, and Kenya, Oliberté is most interested in supporting Africa's middle class as it's a defining element in the success of a country's socio-economic development. If you're on the path of wearing shoes that really make a difference, Sawa Shoes & Oliberte are taking you in the right direction, and in style.

 

Popular
Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.