AKA. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

AKA: “The Solutions To The Issue of Domestic Abuse Actually Have Nothing To Do With Women”

AKA calls men to action regarding the issue of violence against women.

"Forget women speaking out and marching and shit .... when it comes to domestic violence ... what can women do? Nothing. It's MEN who have to unite to protect our women and children. After all, we are the perpetrators," read one from a series of tweets sent out by South African artist AKA this morning.


Supa Mega may not always hold opinions favored by everyone, but one thing you should give him is that he always makes his stances on issues known.

This morning, he took to Twitter to muse on the disturbingly high rate of violence against women in South Africa. This follows the highly-publicized incident where kwaito star Mampintsha assaulted his girlfriend, the self-crowned Gqom Queen, Babes Wodumo.

Supa Mega, during his rant, called men to action, saying they are the ones who have the answers to this, because women are the victims.

AKA is tired of desktop activism, and believes we should put our phones down and actually do something. One tweet read:

"If y'all so outraged why don't you get up off your asses, go March to radio stations, go to musica's ... go to RISA and demand they take this animal's music off the playlist, off the shelves, off the TV ... but no ... you want to tweet and sound woke and shit."

Read AKA's tweets on the issue below.









AKA is clearly putting his money where his mouth is. Last month, he donated R100 000 to the SRC of the University of Witwatersrand following a hunger strike held by students at the university in protest about accomodation and student debts.

Interview
Photo: Shawn Theodore via Schure Media Group/Roc Nation

Interview: Buju Banton Is a Lyrical Purveyor of African Truth

A candid conversation with the Jamaican icon about his new album, Upside Down 2020, his influence on afrobeats, and the new generation of dancehall.

Devout fans of reggae music have been longing for new musical offerings from Mark Anthony Myrie, widely-known as the iconic reggae superstar Buju Banton. A shining son of Jamaican soil, with humble beginnings as one of 15 siblings in the close-knit community of Salt Lane, Kingston, the 46-year-old musician is now a legend in his own right.

Buju Banton has 12 albums under his belt, one Grammy Award win for Best Reggae Album, numerous classic hits and a 30-year domination of the industry. His larger-than-life persona, however, is more than just the string of accolades that follow in the shadows of his career. It is his dutiful, authentic style of Caribbean storytelling that has captured the minds and hearts of those who have joined him on this long career ride.

The current socio-economic climate of uncertainty that the COVID-19 pandemic has thrusted onto the world, coupled with the intensified fight against racism throughout the diaspora, have taken centre stage within the last few months. Indubitably, this makes Buju—and by extension, his new album—a timely and familiar voice of reason in a revolution that has called for creative evolution.

With his highly-anticipated album, Upside Down 2020, the stage is set for Gargamel. The title of this latest discography feels nothing short of serendipitous, and with tracks such as "Memories" featuring John Legend and the follow-up dancehall single "Blessed," it's clear that this latest body of work is a rare gem that speaks truth to vision and celebrates our polylithic African heritage in its rich fullness and complexities.

Having had an exclusive listen to some other tracks on the album back in April, our candid one-on-one conversation with Buju Banton journeys through his inspiration, collaboration and direction for Upside Down 2020, African cultural linkages and the next generational wave of dancehall and reggae.

This interview has been shortened and edited for clarity.

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