Podcasts
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Interview: Tecla Ciolfi On The Journey To Starting Her Popular Podcast ‘Texx Talks’

South African music journalist Tecla Ciolfi launched her podcast 'Texx Talks' at the height of lockdown in 2020. Since then, it has become one of the most notable music platforms in the country.

Tecla "Texx" Ciolfi has been a part of the South African music industry for approximately 15 years, in different capacities, most notably as a music journalist (Rolling Stone South Africa, Cape Times,Your LMG) — as well as the founder and editor-in-chief of the music blog Texx and The City. Between 2013 and 2017, Tecla was the South African editor for the French streaming platform Deezer.

Her recent venture into podcasting is an expansion of Texx and The City. In her weekly podcast Texx Talks, now in its fifth season, she interviews some of the country's top musicians. She's previously hosted the likes of Nasty C, Jeremy Loops, Shekhinah, and a lot more. And in South Africa's burgeoning podcasting scene, Texx Talks has become one of the country's most notable podcasts.

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Music
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Interview: Kwesta and The ‘Ghost of DaKAR’

While making his latest album 'g.o.d Guluva' during the 2020 lockdown, Kwesta opened up to vulnerability and, as a result, left some parts of his old self behind.

As fans continue savouring Kwesta's fourth studio album g.o.d Guluva, released at the end of April, his label Rap Lyf is imploding. He doesn't feel in control but is managing nonetheless. "It's a conversation that affects one personally. That's why I've kind of chosen not to talk about the nitty-gritties of it all, because I'm certain that it still affects me and everyone involved personally," Kwesta opens up.

While awaiting Kwesta to wrap up a telephonic interview, I chuckle at the contrast of his kasi raps, heavy with street slang and disposition, getting written in his suburban home. "Well, during lockdown, I couldn't go back to K1 (Katlehong)," he says when I finally pose the question to him. "That's what I used to do. I'd just go back there and just rap from that space."

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Coming 2 America: New Yorkers in Zamunda

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Interview: Nasty C on The Importance of Sharing His Story

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Interview: How Stogie T’s ‘Freestyle Friday’ Became a TV Show

Freestyle Friday started as lockdown content but is now a fully-fledged TV show on Channel O. In this interview, Stogie T breaks down why the show is revolutionary and talks about venturing into media.

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ProVerb’s Memoir Is A Huge Slap In The Face To South African Hip-Hop

In his memoir, one of South Africa's revered lyricists ProVerb and his co-author compromise his rich story with trite motivational talk.