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'Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai,' A Tuareg Remake of 'Purple Rain' Premieres In US & Europe

Watch the trailer for the Tuareg film remake of 'Purple Rain' & 'The Harder They Come,' starring Mdou Moctar.


A little over a year ago, we reported on Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai (Rain the Color Blue with a little Red in it), a feature-length film starring Tuareg guitarist Mdou Moctar as a musician striving for success amidst the guitar scene in Agadez, Niger. The first film shot entirely in the Tuareg language was co-written and directed by Sahel Sounds' Christopher Kirkley and pays tribute to Prince's film Purple Rain and the Jimmy Cliff vehicle The Harder They Come, will be viewable very soon. Following a premiere at Portland, Oregon's Hollywood Theater on January 29, the film will have another showing on February 5 at Marseille, France's Le Gyptis. Previously, Akounak had a packed screening in Agadez where it was lauded by the attendees and received favorable reviews. As Kirkley explains in an informative and humorous Sahel Sounds article, though, the Kickstarter-funded project will still evolve as there are "rewards coming... DVDs are in production. The soundtrack is in its final stages of mixing and an LP will be released this year. And we are slated to release the film in West Africa across the Tuareg diaspora." In the meantime, check out the trailer for Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai (Rain the Color Blue with a little Red in it) below. 

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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