Audio

Congolese Rapper Alec Lomami Shares The Olugbenga-Produced 'Trouble Anxieux'

Congolese rapper Alec Lomami has an existential crisis in his latest hip-hop track "Trouble Anxieux" featuring Karun Mungai.


Congolese rapper Alec Lomami has an existential crisis in his latest single "Trouble Anxieux," featuring Kenyan singer Karun Mungai and North Carolina's Sony Base. Alec's come a long way since his previous project THE BL∆CK HE∆RTS CLUB alongside Well$ and Lucho, which they described as "a bunch of hopeless romantics trying to make timeless music." With "Trouble Anxieux," Alec makes the shift from high energy 1970s funk to down-tempo industrial trip-hop explaining, "I was in a pretty dark place of existential crisis when I wrote the song. The song is a part of my own catharsis and exorcism of personal demons." Alec's somber verses, rapped in French, include him hauntingly repeating lines like "demain, c'est loin," which translates to "tomorrow is far away," while the soulful voices of Karun Mungai and Sony Base deliver hope toward the end of the track, calling out, "If we keep on going, tomorrow we will see the light."

Alec told us that he "took a little break from putting out music in order to establish the label Immaculate Taste, produce Well$' project and work on THE BL∆CK HE∆RTS CLUB." He now returns with "Trouble Anxieux," which was produced by London-based Nigerian electro-pop musician Olugbenga. This is the first song off Alec Lomami's upcoming Quelques Mots Suffisent EP, which will be released via Immaculate Taste on June 30 as the first of four of his 2015 EPs in the works. Stream "Trouble Anxieux" below.

Audio
Image via Sheila Afari PR.

9 Black Electronic Musicians You Should Be Listening To

Featuring DJ Lag, Spellling, Nozinja, Klein, LSDXOXO and more.

We know that Black queer DJs from the Midwest are behind the creation of house and dance music. Yet, a look at the current electronic scene will find it terribly whitewashed and gentrified, with the current prominent acts spinning tracks sung by unnamed soulful singers from time to time. Like many art forms created by Black people all over the world, the industry hasn't paid homage to its pioneers, despite the obvious influence they have. Thankfully, the independent music scene is thriving with many Black acts inspired by their forefathers and mothers who are here to revolutionize electronic music. Here are a list of the ones you should check out:

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Kwesta Slams BMW South Africa’s Latest Advert For Using His Song Without Permission

Kwesta has called out BMW South Africa for blatantly using his song without his permission.