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Audio: DJ Gioumanne Mixes Up that 80s Afro Funk


We're learning more and more about the music scene in Africa from the 1970s, but what of the 80s? On this mixtape from the Afro Cosmic Club con Gioumanne, those early 80s albums are dusted off (yes, even the 80s have collected dust at this point) and put to good, no, great use. The history of this "afro cosmic" sound comes from the dance floors of Italy in the 1980s when Italian deejays mixed African and Caribbean beats with that hint of psychedelia that had not yet worn off from the 70s.

DJ Juma4, or rather DJ Gioumanne (the Italianized version) gets his hands dirty on this one, saying: "The selection below was loosely inspired by the Afro cosmic era, though many of the tracks were never big on the scene. All tracks were taken from second hand vinyl rescued from garage sales and shady auctions – cos real diggers get their hands dirty. Partly ungoogleable and mostly not available on mp3, here’s a pick from the farthest corners of Juma4′s crates." Via africanhiphop.com.

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