News Brief

Barry Jenkins' Next Film Will Be An Adaptation of James Baldwin's 'If Beale Street Could Talk'

The director of 'Moonlight' is set to adapt James Baldwin's 1974 book 'If Beale Street Could Talk,' into a feature film.

DIASPORA—Barry Jenkins will follow up his Oscar-winning film Moonlight, with an upcoming film adaptation of James Baldwin's 1974 novel If Beale Street Could Talk. 


The love story—set in 1970s Harlem—centers on a young couple, Tish and Fonny who are engaged and about to have their first child. Their lives are upended when Fonny is accused of rape. The story follows Tish as she tries to prove his innocence.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Jenkins wrote the screenplay in the summer of 2013, the same summer he wrote Moonlight.

Jenkins is also set to direct another novel-based adaptation of Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad for Amazon.

“We are delighted to entrust Barry Jenkins with this adaptation," said Baldwin's sister, Gloria Karefa-Smart in a statement. "Barry is a sublimely conscious and gifted filmmaker, whose Medicine for Melancholy impressed us so greatly that we had to work with him.”

Jenkins has expressed his enthusiasm about the upcoming project. “James Baldwin is a man of and ahead of his time; his interrogations of the American consciousness have remained relevant to this day," said Jenkins in a statement.

“To translate the power of Tish and Fonny’s love to the screen in Baldwin’s image is a dream I’ve long held dear. Working alongside the Baldwin Estate, I’m excited to finally make that dream come true.”

Production for the film is set to begin in October.

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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