Photos

Beatenberg Brings South Africa to Okay Space at Mumford & Sons' 'Johannesburg' Pop-Up Exhibition

Take a look at images from the evening featuring a live, intimate set from Beatenburg and portable studio from Found Sound Nation.

The sun from the hot, Brooklyn Saturday—days before the official start of summer—couldn't even stand the heat coming from Okay Space at the one of many finales of Mumford & Sons' 'Johannesburg' South African Experience Pop-Up Exhibition.


Walking in—right across the illuminated photos of Mumford & Sons and the squad who featured on their new mini-album that released this week: The Very Best, Baaba Maal and Beatenberg—was a portable studio set up by Found Sound Nation. There, with the help of Freshlyground's Kyla-Rose Smith and emcees from Cape Town's township, Nyanga, attendees were invited to lay down instrumentals, freestyles and vocals and see the process of the cypher come to fruition.

Those who joined us at Okay Space weren't just there to check out the art show that was well received by visitors all week, but to also experience a live, intimate set from Beatenberg. Cooling down during the evening with Extra Pale Ale and IPA craft beers from our friends over at Atlanta's Sweetwater Brewing Co. (who's been in the NYC for three months and is available for purchase in the metro area), the group's small league of fans and curious listeners alike gathered around the trio to hear the soothing Cape Town sound.

Senegalese living legend, Baaba Maal, came by to hear his friends' set too, as he signed vinyl copies of  'Johannesburg' and soaked in well wishes (I definitely had a fangirl moment too—as he convinced me that it's high time I take a trip to Dakar) from fans. Mumford & Sons member Winston Marshall also popped in to chill with fans hang out in the pop-up space.

Soon after the group performed their hits including, "Pluto," "Rafael" and "Beauty Like A Tightened Bow," drummer Robin Brink hooked his laptop up to the speakers, filling the room with a banging South African house set until the doors closed.

Take a closer look into the evening with the images below, brought to you by, Jammi York Photography:

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

Photo by Jammi York Photography.

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