News Brief

Big Star and Kwesta Pay Homage To Kwaito and Pantsula Culture In The Video For ‘Sgubu’

Watch Big Star Johnson and Kwesta's video for 'Sgubu.'

On the video for South African rapper Big Star Johnson's Kwesta-assisted single "Sgubu," you'll see pantsulas gyrating in All Stars and Dickies suits, reminiscent of kwaito videos of the 90s and early 2000s.


The song itself borrows from kwaito, from the loungey pads and big bassline, to Big Star and Kwesta's nonchalant delivery and kwaito references in their lyrics.

The hook is appropriated from the TKZee song "Mambotjie" from their classic album Halloween (1998), and there are plenty of lines from vintage kwaito songs on "Sgubu," so much that it feels like an inside joke only understood by those who grew up on kwaito.

Read: The 10 Best Kwaito Producers

If you are a fan of kwaito like this writer, you'll definitely love this video and this song. The video was directed by Joburg-based director Kuda Jemba, who also directed Big Star's video for "Pablo."

"Sgubu" is a single from Big Star's upcoming debut album, Me & Mines, releasing August 24th via the label Vth Season.

About the album, the artist says:

"Currently I'm at a place where I'm the most comfortable I've ever been in the industry. And I'm finally at a place where I feel I can express myself. I'm hella excited about the future and what it holds for me."

"Sgubu" is the third song we've heard from the album, after the jazz-influenced classic "Time of my Life," which dropped a few months ago, and "Closer," which is yours when you pre-order or pre-save the album. Judging from the three songs, Me & Mines should be a gem.

Watch the video for "Sgubu" below:

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.