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Black Coffee’s Latest Residency Is In Las Vegas

Black Coffee hits the ground running in 2018.

South African house DJ and producer Black Coffee's 2018 is off to a great start. He is one of the only two African-based acts on this year's Coachella lineup.


As if that wasn't awesome enough, last night, the DJ took to Twitter to announce that he will be a resident DJ at Wyn Las Vegas, a luxury resort and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. Coffee's residency was announced alongside other two fellow "leaders of the underground tech house revolution" Solomun and Jamie Jones.

Wynn's managing partner Alex Cordova told Billboard, "These first-ever tech house residencies on the Strip will showcase three of the biggest names in the genre. Tech house continues to rise in popularity in the United States and abroad, and we look forward to bringing and expanding this music style into our programming."

Read: 10 Classic South African House Songs You Need to Hear

Last year Coffee, among other power moves, appeared on Drake's More Life playlist/album, became a resident DJ at Hï Ibiza (a club in Ibiza), and also became the first African artist to host his own show on Apple's Beats 1 Beats 1?

He also revealed, he was supposed to work on Jay-Z's 4:44, and that Rihanna wants to work with him. How about the time he almost worked with Usher, but didn't because he didn't feel comfortable with what the R&B's expectations of him were?

Slow down, Coffee, you killin' em!

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7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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