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Here Are the 4 South African Features In The 'Black Panther' Soundtrack

Breaking down the appearances by South African artists in the Black Panther album.

The Black Panther soundtrack has officially arrived and it's all sorts of great.

Among the international stars that contributed to the album, the album features four South African artists whose collaborations we're about to dig into here after giving the album a listen.


Here is how we think the four South African artists did on their features in the Black Panther album.

Sjava

Sjava's a messenger of the people. You can never fault the way this man tells his story and the impeccable way in this he's managed to modernize the maskandi and mbhaqanga singing styles. The way he sings his praises when introducing himself in the beginning of his verse on "Seasons" will surely give you goosebumps. His verse is solid—it's emotional but not whiny, and it reveals a man who's comfortable with his story and who he is. If you understand IsiZulu, then this verse will put you in your feels. An excerpt:

"Laph' eng'phuma khona, maw'phuma khona bathi aw'fiki la/
Ngyamangala uma ngila/
Bebathi ng'yophelel' emoyeni, ba-right/
Manje ngiy'nkanyezi"

Yugen Blakrok

The politically-charged "Opps" is one of the strongest songs on this album. Vince and Kendrick were always going to spit technically correct verses. Vince, as usual, advocates for our right as black people to do whatever the fuck we like, which we are constantly being denied ("They don't wanna see me gettin' to the check/ They just wanna see me swimming in the debt"). Yugen Blakrok, on her verse, proves she's a high caliber emcee who does more than rhyme "and" with "land." She rhymes in syllables over a skittering rhythm, over a tempo you normally wouldn't hear in her own music. She's outside of her comfort zone, but manages to excel. Yugen Blakrok makes the difficult look easy as she raps potent lines such as:

"Mouth piece drawn, got a verbal armory/
Stack bodies, not figurines/
Move beneath the surface, submarine/
I'm half machine, obscene with a light sword/
Look inside the brain, it's a ride in the psych ward"

Babes Wodumo

All of Babes Wodumo's lyrics are almost 100% in IsiZulu. Even during interviews, she hardly ever utters an English word. Power to that. But her verse on "Redemption" is mostly done in English, except for the vocable "kikirikiki." Something seems off here. She doesn't sound like her usual charismatic self, it's as if she's curbing her own personality. While her appearance is not bad, it just lacks the x-factor that has made Babes Wodumo the star she is. In short, she can do better.

Saudi

You either love Saudi's music or you hate it–there hardly ever is an in-between. In "X," Saudi is part of a spaz fest alongside Kendrick, SchoolBoy Q and 2 Chainz. He switches between melodic and conventional raps on his verse, just like he does on most of his songs. There's nothing innovative about that, but he delivers his verse so suavely you can overlook mediocre lines like: "I keep the piece on me, I leave you puzzled," and "I'm higher than her Dad's salary." Side note: How great is 2 Chainz' verse on this song, though?

Listen to the whole album below.

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Listen to WurlD's New 'Love Is Contagious' EP

A sound that connects to the quintessential Afropolitan mind.

Nigerian-American singer WurlD drops his new 9-song EP, Love Is Contagious.

The new release, which is led by popular singles like "Show You Off" featuring Walshy Fire & Shizzi and "Contagious," sees the blue-haired WurlD blending elements of Nigerian juju music with pop and R&B;, making for a captivating and energetic fusion.

"Love is Contagious is a conversation about love, from the infatuation stage to drowning in the emotion to the commitment stage," mentions WurlD. "This EP is something everyone can relate to at some point in their lives. It has always been my goal to add a different range to the conversation and Love is Contagious does that, taking my fans and family on the journey a man goes through finding himself in love."

WurlD's creates "a sound that connects to the quintessential Afropolitan mind," wrote our contributor Joey Akan in an exclusive interview piece with the Lagos-born singer.

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Social Media Is Doodling On Pictures of Burundi's President In Support of Arrested Schoolgirls

Folks online are using the hashtag #FreeOurGirls to remind Burundi's president that scribbling is not a crime.

Last week, three Burundian schoolgirls were taken into custody after doodling on a picture of President Pierre Nkurunziza in their textbooks. The girls, all under the age of 18, face up to five years in prison for the act.

Now folks on social media are rallying behind the girls, using the hashtag #FreeOurGirls. People are not only voicing their unwavering support for the young girls against the heavy hand of the president, they're also using it as an opportunity to share pictures of the president with their own doodles.

In true elementary form, some images show the president with playfully drawn-on mustaches, hats and hair. One of the more creative doodles shows the president with a curled mustached and a short blue wig on.

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Nasty C. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Nasty C Says The EP He’s Working on With NO I.D. Will Sound “Close to Home”

Nasty C says the songs on the EP he's working on with No I.D. "will sound so close to home, it will feel like they should be our gospel songs."

By now you should know Nasty C is working on some music with No I.D.. Ever since images of the South African rapper and producer in studio with No I.D. and Big Sean hit the internet about a month ago, we've all been kept guessing.

However, Nasty recently shared some new details about the project. While talking to Slikour in an interview that was published on Slikour On Life, the Durban rapper shared what the response to his sophomore album Strings and Bling (2018) meant to him.

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