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Boddhi Satva & James Germain's 'An Nou Ale' Is A Beautiful Pan-African Dance

Watch our premiere of the video for the Haitian and Senegal-influenced single "An Nou Ale."

Last December, Boddhi Satva took a trip to Port-Au-Prince, Haiti were he connected with some of the island's artists. One of those artists he worked with was singer James Germain, known as the creator of Kreol Mandingue.

The result of the artists' collaboration is "An Nou Ale" (Haitian creole for "Let's Go" or "Let's Go Together"), which sees the Central African Republic producer and Haitian singer link up with kora master N'Faly Kouyate.


Boddhi Satva describes the song as "a tribute to the Divine feminine Energy living within us all and being the necessary glue to Unity between Black and Brown people around the globe. A necessary Energy to also keep together the spirit of pan-Africanism."

We're now premiering the music video for the track, which was shot and directed by Gilles Geekk in Brussels with art direction from Najwa Borro. The hypnotizing music video follows four dancers as they swerve their way across a beautiful home.

"The video is a true tribute to African traditions including special symbolic pieces of African history never before used in a music video," Boddhi mentions to OkayAfrica. "The Dance Spoons of the Dan people (from the Ivory Coast) and Belly masks (of the Makonde people of Tanzania). All pieces carefully chosen by Borro to emphasize the importance of the divine feminine energy and how it connects both woman and man spiritually."

Watch the music video for "An Nou Ale" below.






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Watch Boddhi Satva's New Video For 'Muasi Na Ngai'

We premiere the Portugal-shot video for this new single featuring Badi and Kaysha.

Central African DJ and producer Boddhi Satva is known for his Afrohouse style of 'Ancestral Soul,' a blend of traditional rhythms with soul and electronic music.

The producer is back today with a new music video for "Muasi Na Ngai," which translates to 'my woman' in Lingala. The single sees him pairing up with Belgian rapper Badi and Congolese singer Kaysha, both acts that he's collaborated with before, for a song that blends French, English, and Lingala lyrics.

The new video, which we're premiering here today, was shot in Portugal and celebrates black beauty and womanhood.

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Boddhi Satva & Badi's Video For 'Kitendi' Is A Black Vintage Fashion Dream

"The art direction and wardrobe give a hybrid mixture of styling eras with a forward-thinking approach," says Boddhi Satva.

Central African DJ and producer Boddhi Satva is sharing the new video for “Kitendi,” featuring Congolese-Belgian rapper Badi—a track that sees the MC flex over paralyzing kicks and bass lines.

The video, which we are premiering here today, was art directed by London-based dandies Sam Lambert and Shaka Maidoh of ACF with vintage styling by Amah Ayivi. 

It showcases the lovely people at Café Barge in Paris with flashes of of legendary African musicians such as Stervos Niarcos, Papa Wemba and Kester Emeneya who pioneered “La SAPE,” a fashion movement in the 60s.

“‘Kitendi,’” says Boddhi Satva, “took Badi and I out of our musical comfort zone. The art direction by Art Comes First and wardrobe by Marché Noir give a hybrid mixture of styling eras with a forward-thinking approach. Most importantly, this project is a 100% Pan African effort.”

Watch the Gilles Geek-directed video for “Kitendi” above.

 

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14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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