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Muhammadu Buhari Has Won Nigeria's Presidential Elections

Muhammadu Buhari will be serving a second term in office.

In the early hours of this morning, the electoral commission announced that 76-year-old Muhammadu Buhari of the All Progressives Congress secured 56% of the vote. Buhari defeated his rival Atiku Abubakar of the People's Democratic Party by 4 million votes. However, opposition parties have alleged that poll rigging, electoral malpractice as well as violence, resulted in voting irregularities.


After announcing that he would be running for re-election in the 2019 presidential elections, many Nigerians were not elated by the news and expressed their sentiments on social media. They felt that Buhari needed to make room for younger blood and that it was time for him to gracefully step down.

Speaking on his victory today, Buhari said:

"The new administration will intensify its efforts in security, restructuring the economy and fighting corruption. We will strive to strengthen our unity and inclusiveness so that no section or group will feel left behind, or left out."

Watch the electoral commission's announcement below:

Pres'l Results: Buhari Wins Lagos www.youtube.com

READ: 5 Young Nigerians Share Their Hopes and Fears for the Upcoming Election

After the elections were postponed for a week, just hours before voting was set to begin, it is a relief that the results have finally been announced. At least 47 Nigerians were killed across the country due to election violence.

However, the People's Democratic Party, has cited poll rigging, vote buying and the altering of voter data and wants the results for at least two states to be rerun. This may very well lead to an official and legal challenge of the election results and Buhari's win.

International observers, however, stated that the irregularities were not enough to change the overall results.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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