Popular

The cover for Buhlebendalo's new album 'Chosi.'

Listen to Buhlebendalo’s Cover of Brenda Fassie’s ‘Too Late for Mama’

Buhlebendalo covers Brenda Fassie's 'Too Late for Mama' in her new album.

South African healer and musician Buhlebendalo's new album ends with a cover of late South African music legend Brenda Fassie's 1989 hit "Too Late for Mama."

The song tells the story of a woman who gets struck lightning together with her baby while she's out in the bush to fetch some water.


Brenda Fassie's vocals sound distant and echoes contributing to the intense emotion being expressed in the song. While Brenda Fassie's vocals on the original version of "Too Late for Mama" is accompanied by a dancebale instrumental, Buhlebendalo's version treats itself as a jazz piece. The beat was replayed by a band which embellishes the tune with keys and a wider bassline.

Buhlebendalo - Too late for Mama (Brenda Fassie Cover) www.youtube.com

The cover appears on Buhlebendalo's newly released debut album Chosi.

The words "Chosi" is a response to a storyteller before and after they tell a story in Xhosa, Zulu and other Nguni languages. On Chosi, Buhlebendalo tells her story, giving insights on her spiritual journey and offers her take on the human condition. The 13-track feaures artists such as Sjava, Madala Kunene and Mthetheleli Gongotha.

"Everything I'm passionate about is communicated in the lyrical content of the album but it was mostly triggered by [abuse] that women go through every day, even in the so-called safety of their own homes," Buhlebendalo told Dispatch LIVE earlier this month prior to the album's release.

Chosi is the artist's first solo album. She has been a member of the group The Soil since the early 2010s. Another member of The Soil Ntsika released his debut album last year.

Stream Chosi on Apple Music and Spotify.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.