News Brief
Cassper Nyovest. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Cassper Nyovest Announces New Album and Shares Single ‘Gets Getsa 2.0’

Listen to the South African rapper's new age kwaito banger.

Cassper Nyovest's latest single sees him return to what made him a household name—mixing hip-hop and kwaito on songs such as "Gusheshe" and "Doc Shebeleza." New age kwaito is the 21st century version of kwaito, which was popularized by South African rappers such as HHP, K.O., Spoek Mathambo, Blaklez and more.


While in the past few years, the rapper has been dishing out a lot of trap singes ("Tito Mboweni," "Ksazoba Lit" etc.), on "Gets Getsa 2.0," he rides a bass-laden kwaito beat and takes it "back to kasi."

The South African rapper has also announced that a new album is on the way. "Gets Getsa 2.0" is the first single from that upcoming fourth studio album, which is currently untitled, and has no release date.

His last new age kwaito gem "Nyuku" was a fan-favorite, but he didn't highlight it as a single. "Gets Getsa 2.0" takes on the same form as "Nyuku." The hook features uncredited female vocalists, and is reminiscent of old school kwaito songs by the likes of Doc Shebeleza and Arthur Mafokate and artists that were signed to his 999 Records stable.

Just like on most of his songs, the rapper makes a lot of South African references like to this hilarious video of an Orlando Pirates fan, Good Enough Sithole. He also raps, "You can clearly see that I'm African like squad sa France."

"Gets Getsa 2.0" is Nyovest on his element, and as we say good-bye to the winter, it could be one of the biggest songs this summer.

Listen to "Gets Getsa 2.0" below:


Read: Hip-Hop & Kwaito's Long Love-Hate Relationship

Film
(Youtube)

10 African Films That Deal With Protest Culture & History

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression, and this has been represented significantly in cinema.

Around the world, Nigerians in the diaspora have picked up the mantle of protesting peacefully against police brutality and violence. These gatherings are a direct extension of the nationwide protests that were brought to a tragic halt in Lagos after soldiers of the Nigerian army fired guns at peaceful protesters at the Lekki tollgate venue.

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression and this has been represented significantly in cinema. This list, while not an exhaustive one, attempts to contextualize this rich cinematic history, tracing the complex and diverse ways that protest culture have been reflected in African film. From influential classics that are now considered required viewing to fascinating portraits of individual resistance, these films are proof that the struggle continues, regardless.

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