Popular

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Discusses Blackness and How The American Left "Is Creating Its Own Decline"

The acclaimed writer shared her thoughts on the American left during a panel discussion with The New Yorker.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie sat down for a conversation with The New Yorker last Friday, where she discussed the writing process of her seminal book, Americanah, fighting racism in the United States in the age of Trump, the concept of "blackness," and most notably her thoughts on the state of the "American Left."


Speaking with The New Yorker editor David Remnick, Adichie shared her thoughts on, what she referred to as, "the left that is heard." She critiqued those who identify as part of this group for failing to unify and work together, contrasting that with what she believes is the right's ability to move in solidarity.

"I almost feel as though the left is creating its own decline. I think the left doesn't know how to be a tribe, in the way the right does," she said. "The left is very cannibalistic. It eats its own."

She went on to clarify, that it's not leftist ideals that she disagrees with, but rather, what she considers, the impractical rules by which the stance operates.

"There's something to be said, of course, for ideals, and I believe very much in that," Adichie said. "There can be an extremist idea of purity. It's so easy to fall afoul of the ridiculously high standard set there."

She was then asked about her personal experience, dealing with criticism from the left. She discussed an incident that occurred earlier this year when she came under fire for controversial statements she made about trans women. "In the quest for inclusiveness, the left is willing to discard a certain kind of complex truth. I think there's a quickness to assign ill intent," she said in response to the backlash she received at the time.

"The response is not to debate, the response is to silence."

Adichie went on to discuss how she came to terms with the idea of "blackness"—a concept, she says, was unfamiliar to her growing up in Nigeria. "It took reading and learning, and kind of concisely taking on that identity, which I think in many ways is also a political identity."

Watch the full conversation below.

Interview

Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

The 7 Best Nigerian Songs of the Month (July)

Featuring Olamide, Lady Donli, Omah Lay, Adekunle Gold, Falz and more.