News Brief

You Can Always Count on Adichie to Keep it 100 About the World’s Refugee Crisis

Watch the Americanah' and 'Half of a Yellow Sun' author address the United Nations for World Humanitarian day in NYC.

Considering Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie knows intimately how migration can upend life, her selection as the keynote speaker for the United Nation’s World Humanitarian Day—focusing on the global refugee crisis last week—was apropos.


The Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun author’s parents fled during Nigeria’s Biafra War and spent three years in a refugee camp.

What’s more, Quartz Africa reports that a quarter of the world’s refugee population—that’s 18 million people—are escaping conflicts that have disrupted everyday life in countries like South Sudan, Somalia, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

During her speech delivered in NYC, Adichie cautioned against othering, basically applying monolithic thinking to justify writing off or stereotyping an entire group of people.

“Nobody is ever just a refugee. Nobody is ever just a single thing. And yet, in the public discourse today, we often speak of people as a single a thing. Refugee. Immigrant.”

Instead, the novelist proposes that we choose love over hatred or fear, saying:

In my language, Igbo, the word for ‘love’ is ‘ifunanya’ and its literal translation is, ‘to see.’ So I would like to suggest today that this is a time for a new narrative, a narrative in which we truly see those about whom we speak.

Let us tell a different story. Let us remember that the movement of human beings on earth is not new. Human history is a history of movement and mingling. Let us remember that we are not just bones and flesh. We are emotional beings. We all share a desire to be valued, a desire to matter. Let us remember that dignity is as important as food.

Without a doubt, you can always count on Adichie to keep it 100.

Spare a moment today and watch the prolific author’s address below.

Interview

This Compilation Shines a Light On East African Underground Music

We talk to a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation from Uganda's Nyege Nyege.

Nyege Nyege, a label in Kampala, Uganda is channelling the confidence brimming over a whole continent. Africa is no longer the future. For dance music, its time is right now.

Music For the Eagles is a compilation released in conjunction with Soundcloud to showcase the best new acts that East Africa has to offer outside the mainstream. A new wave of artists firmly blasting non-conformist energy for you to spasm to. Music that takes you places. Otim Alpha's high BPM wedding frenzy of incessant rasping vocals accompanied by feverous violin will have you clawing the walls to oblivion. Anti Vairas' dancehall from a battleship with super galactic intentions doesn't even break a sweat as it ruins you. FLO's beautiful sirens call, is a skittish and detuned nursery rhyme that hints at a yearning for love but reveals something far more unnerving. Ecko Bazz's tough spiralling vocal over sub-bass and devil trap energy is an anthem that can only be bewailed. And Kidane Fighter's tune is more trance-like prayer. These are only some of the highlights for you to shake it out to.

We got to chat with a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation as they took a break from the studio below.

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