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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Wins PEN Pinter Prize

The Nigerian author was awarded one of literature's top prizes for her "refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has just been announced as the winner for the 2018 PEN Pinter Prize.

The prize is annually awarded to a writer from Ireland, Britain, or the Commonwealth and is named after the Nobel-Prize winning playwright and human rights activist Harold Pinter. The award is given to a writer with an "unflinching, unswerving gaze upon the world" who strives "to define the real truth of our lives and our societies."

This year's judges praised Adichie for her "refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others," describing her as "sophisticated beyond measure in her understanding of gender, race and global inequality."


Responding to the news of the award, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie said, "I admired Harold Pinter's talent, his courage, his lucid dedication to telling his truth, and I am honoured to be given an award in his name."

Adichie will receive the prize on October 9 at the British library where she will also announce her co-winner for the International Writer of Courage Award who will be selected from a shortlist of international writers.

Former winners of the award include Michael Longley, Margaret Atwood, James Fenton, Salman Rushdie, Tom Stoppard, Carol Ann Duffy, David Hare, Hanif Kureishi, and Tony Harrison.

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Photo by Toka Hlongwane.

Toka Hlongwane’s Photo Series ‘Impilo ka Darkie’ Aims to Give an Insight Into Black South Africans’ Experiences

With his latest photo series, 'Impilo ka Darkie', South African photographer Toka Hlongwane offers an imperfect but compelling insight into the lives of the people he has encountered through his travels.

Toka Hlongwane is a Johannesburg-based documentary photographer whose work often casts a lens on society's underclass. His most recent photo series, Impilo ka Darkie, shot over five years, is Hlongwane's attempt to answer two questions: what does it mean to be Black? And, above that, what is the measure of Black life?

Part of Impilo ka Darkie's appeal is that it also documents Hlongwane's growth as a photographer. As the years roll on, his composition becomes stronger, the focus on his pictures becomes much sharper and a storyline begins to emerge in his work.

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Still taken from 'Nkulunkulu' music video.

Kamo Mphela's Latest EP 'Nkulunkulu' is a Must-Listen

While Kamo Mphela's comparison to the late Lebo Mathosa has been front and centre, it's really her vibrant amapiano EP 'Nkulunkulu' that should be centre stage.

South African amapiano artist, Kamo Mphela, has been a major talking point on social media recently after one fan on social media compared her to the late kwaito artist, Lebo Mathosa. While the debate focused on whether the comparison had any merit to it (as is often the case in comparisons between new wave and veteran artists), what is undeniable is the talent of both women. Twenty-one-year-old Mphela, who released her Nkulunkulu EP last week, delivered a vibrant project which deserves to be acknowledged beyond conversations that unwittingly take away from her own journey as an upcoming artist.

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Photo by Alfredo Zuniga / AFP

Mozambique's Political Unrest: Where Things Stand

Fears continue to be on the rise as more attacks by militants are anticipated in Mozambique's Cabo Delgado province.

On March 24th, militants stormed Palma—a gas-rich city in Mozambique—as part of an ongoing insurgency in the country dating back to 2017. Dozens of civilians have been killed although an official death toll has not been declared as of yet. Currently, at least 8000 more have been left displaced, fleeing to other parts of the country and attempting to seek asylum in Tanzania. This is believed to be the worst attacks carried out by the Islamist militant group, Al-Shabaab, to date.
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Former Burkinabe President Charged with Thomas Sankara's Murder

Justice is on the horizon as Burkina Faso's former president, Blaise Compaore, is indicted for the 1987 assassination of Thomas Sankara.