Audio

Lamin Fofana's Chinua Achebe Tribute

Stream Lamin Fofana's two-part Chinua Achebe homage, in commemoration of his first post-humous birthday.


This Saturday, November 16 will be Chinua Achebe's first post-humous birthday since his passing last March. BK-based Sierra Leonean producer Lamin Fofana commemorates the date with this two-part Achebe tribute. Lamin explained it best himself:

I wanted to pay homage to the late Professor Chinua Achebe, Africa's foremost writer and one of the most important writers of the 20th century. His work influenced me immensely; my sense of identity, vision of Africa, the power of storytelling, having a voice, dignity, and grace. I read Chike and the River when I was ten years old. Nearly two decades later, I continue to draw inspiration from his novels and essays including Arrow of God and Home and Exile. It is by total coincidence that I'm revealing this now - but it is fitting that November 16, 2013 is the first post-humous birthday of Chinua Achebe.

"Homage (Until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.)" is something I made earlier this year, around the time of Achebe's passing. It is composed almost entirely of samples from  cassette I got from the WFMU library.

"Grace (Binyavanga Wainaina Remembers Chinua Achebe)" is an appropriated/hijacked audio of acclaimed writer Binyavanga Wainaina talking about Chinua Achebe with some natural sounds and music add. Binyavanga is also a hero. He played at the release party for my last EP.

Stream Lamin Fofana's Chinua Achebe tribute below and download it over at his label Sci-Fi & Fantasy.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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