popular

The 10 Best Songs From The Latest Wave Of Coupé Décalé

We round up the best songs and videos from a new crop of Coupe Decale artists.


Coupé Décalé is riding out another wave of popularity. Originating from the Parisian-Ivorian diaspora and of course Côte d'Ivoire, the heavily-percussive and melodic dance music will push you to the dancefloor without you even noticing. The minimalist arrangements combined with deep bass and zouk/zouglou influences usually become a sweet addiction.

2013 was a great year for coupé décalé as the infectious music videos coming from the genre kept one-upping each other. New styles, new steps, flowing rhythms, and gyrating hips all kept our bodies moving forward last year. We talked with some coupé décalé lovers in our sphere and, after a long debate, we came out with a fierce top 10 for your eyes and ears. We'd like to give a special mention to young rising star Chocoto de Babi, who we're sure will be part of the next crop of coupé décalé highlights. In the meantime, enjoy and dance as you remember how coupé décalé rocked last year.  Feel free to let us know  your favorite tune by tweeting @Okayafrica with #coupedecale.

Next Page
popular
Photo by Yamarie Mayol.

Here Are the Winners at the 2019 African Muzik Magazine Awards in Dallas

These are the big winners at this year's African Muzik Magazine Awards (AFRIMMA).

This is an article about the African Muzik Awards which took place in October. For the results of the 2019 All Africa Music Awards (AFRIMA) winners, please follow this link.

The 2019 African Muzik Magazine Awards (AFRIMMA) took place over the weekend in Dallas, Texas.

The awards show hosted a lot of the biggest and brightest new African talent, with the likes of Fally Ipupa, 2Baba, Zlatan Rema, and many more in attendance. The show is not to be confused with the All Africa Music Awards (AFRIMA) which is a seperate event taking place in November.

The big winners at the 2019 AFRIMMAs include Nigeria's Zlatan, who took home the Best Newcomer award and the Song of the Year award for "Killin Dem" alongside Burna Boy. Burna Boy also won the Artist of the Year award.

For the Best East African Male and Female awards, Tanzania's Ommy Dimpoz and Kenya's Akothee won big. In the Best Male Southern Africa categories, Master KG took home a trophy, while Fally Ipupa won for Best Male Central Africa.

Late Ivorian star DJ Arafat received a post-humous honor for Best Francophone, while Togo's Toofan won Best African Group. Phyno won Best Rap Act and his fellow countryman Rema won Video of the Year.

Additionally, 2Baba was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

See the full list of 2019 AFRIMMA winners below.

Keep reading...
popular
Fans pay tribute to DJ Arafat at the site of his motorcycle accident in Abidjan. Photo: ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Hommage to DJ Arafat, the King of Coupé-Décalé

Celebrating the late Ivorian artist who helped birth francophone Africa's urban music scene.

News of DJ Arafat's death broke the morning of Monday, August 12th.

DJ Arafat was the ambassador of a music form popularized in Cote D'Ivoire but exported worldwide. Long before azonto, Nigerian music's command of air waves and the blanket term "afrobeats," he commanded Coupé-Décalé's fast percussion, vocals and dances. He gave birth to Francophone Africa's urban music scene.

A nation mourned. Europeans mourned. Africans worldwide mourned. Abidjan, his home, is said to have been cloudy all day.

Condolences poured out from far and wide: Ivorian Culture Minister, Maurice Kouakou Bandaman, President Alassane Ouattara, footballers Samuel Eto'o and Didier Drogba, musicians Burna Boy, Davido, Iyanya, MHD from a prison cell, Salatiel, Magic System's A'salfo, Serge Beynaud, DJ Mix Premier, his protégés Ariel Sheney and the group Kiff No Beat to name a few.

Fans cried and screamed in front of the hospital his body lay as well as his home. They chanted, "Il n'est pas mort" ("he isn't dead"). The King of Coupé-Décalé was gone.

Keep reading...
popular
Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Keep reading...
popular

University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

Keep reading...

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.