News Brief
Darkie Fiction. Supplied.

Watch Our Premiere of Darkie Fiction’s Music Video for ‘Bhoza’

The Joburg-based duo just released a video for their second single.

The music video for Cape Town-based duo Darkie Fiction's latest single "Bhoza," features a legion of familiar faces of the new wave, from the rapper Robin Thirdfloor to the Pap Culture trio, among others, gyrating and serving looks.


Lyrically, the song, which takes some influences from old school kwaito, is uplifting, with the duo encouraging you to rise above adversity, and boss up.

"'Bhoza' epitomizes a proudly South African, VUK'UZENZELE, warm and up-lifting song for all ages," say the duo in email to OkayAfrica. "We really strive to make family friendly, feel-good music and what says feel-good better than hard-hitting 808s, juicy horns and uplifting lyrics. We wrote the song when we were broke and tired so we needed to remind ourselves who we were."

The video was directed by Chase Musslewhite and filmed by Jason Prins. "Those two really brought the song and our vision for it to life. Working with them was an absolute treat. The video, just like the song, is all about rising up and feeling good and we depict that in a 100% South African way."

"Bhoza" is a follow-up to Darkie Fiction's first single, "Selula," released last year by the then-newly-formed duo. The duo is one of the many young South African artists who are keeping kwaito alive by blending it with modern genres such as electronic and hip-hop.

Watch the "Bhoza" music video below, and follow Darkie Fiction on Twitter, Instagram and SoundCloud.



Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.