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Diamond Platnumz & Rayvanny’s 'Mwanza' Has Been Banned In Tanzania

It's been deemed "too vulgar" to be played in the country.

Tanzania's national arts council, Baraza la Sanaa Tanzania (BASATA) has banned Diamond Platnumz and Rayvanny's latest single "Mwanza," and slapped the artists with a hefty fine due to its sexual content.

The board has ordered the label Wasafi Records to remove the track from all digital platforms, and it will no longer be played on the radio or in clubs in Tanzania, reports Kahawa Tungu. The popular song has over 2 million views on YouTube.


Rayvanny Ft Diamond Platnumz - Mwanza (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com

The ban has resulted in a fine of 9 million Tanzanian shillings ($3,924) for the two artists and the record label, reports Nairobi News.

BASATA claimed that the artists were aware of the country's strict laws around morality before they produced the record. The artists met with the board to discuss the banning on Tuesday.

"This song isn't good at all," said Godfrey Mngereza head of BASATA, according to Nairobi News. "We even asked Rayvanny in the meeting if he can sing the lyrics of the song before his parents and his answer was no. This is a clear indication that even in the singer's eyes, the song goes against the morals," he added. He added that given the artist's popularity and star status, the lyrics would negatively impact youth listeners.

According to Kahawa Tungu, this is the third Diamond Platnumz song to be banned in the country after the songs 'Hallelujah' featuring Morgan Heritage and 'Waka' featuring Rick Ross.

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Image by Bruce Mars via Pexels.

The Director of Urban Music at YouTube Shares 5 Ways to Discover New African Music in 2019

We speak with music exec, Tuma Basa about the best ways to find new African music.

Music discovery just isn't the same anymore.

The Spotifys, Apple Musics and Tidals of the world have completely transformed the way we find new music. Gone are the olden days when we'd wait for new music to premiere on the radio or 106 & Park. The feeling of sliding in a new CD to a car stereo has been swapped with simply typing in an artist's name on a streaming app. This has major implications for what music ends up landing in front of us.

Tuma Basa, the Director of Urban Music at YouTube, refers to this as the "democratization" of music, in which choice is king and every artist and genre is available at our fingertips. But it also means there's a lot more "fluff" to sift through. It seems mediocre songs get more exposure than ever, making it harder to land on the actual "good stuff."

"There are so many choices now that you just have to be dope, and you have to be honest," says Basa. "Whereas, back in the day people just didn't have choices, maybe there's only one video channel. Maybe there was only one radio station that played your kind of music in your market. Now because of digital, the playing field has been equalized. I don't have to listen to an official thing, I can make it myself."

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Update: Tanzanian Government Says Crackdown on Gay Citizens 'Does Not Represent' Official Policy

The Tanzanian government says that Regional Commissioner Paul Makonda was "airing his personal opinion" about his plans to target gay citizens on social media.

UPDATE: 11/5/18

The Tanzanian government says it does not back Regional Commissioner Paul Makonda's massive crackdown on gay citizens. Stating that it "does not represent" government policy, reports BBC Africa.

Makonda's discriminatory plan garnered a fury of backlash from rights groups and observers on social media when it was first announced last week.

"Mr Makonda was only airing his personal opinion," rather than government policy, said the government in a statement. Adding that the government would "continue to respect and uphold all human rights as provided for in the country's constitution."

It is still unclear, however, whether or not Makonda will go ahead with plans to enlist a task force to target LGBTQ Tanzanians through information found on social media, which he said would begin today.

Despite the government's attempts to distance itself from the proposed plan, Tanzanian law still deems "homosexual acts" illegal and punishable by up to 30 years in prison—an enduring law from the country's colonial era.

Continue for original story:

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Stormzy performs during The BRIT Awards 2020 at The O2 Arena. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage) via Getty Images.

Watch Stormzy's Powerful BRIT Awards Performance Featuring Burna Boy

The night saw the British-Ghanaian star run through a medley of songs from his latest album, Heavy Is the Head.

The BRIT Awards 2020, which went down earlier this week, saw the likes of Stormzy take home the Best Male trophy home and Dave win Best Album.

The night also saw Stormzy deliver a stunning performance that featured a medley of songs from his latest album, Heavy Is the Head. The British-Ghanaian star started things out slow with "Don't Forget to Breathe," before popping things off with "Do Better" then turning up the heat with "Wiley Flow."

Stormzy nodded to J Hus, playing a short bit of "Fortune Teller," before being joined onstage by Nigeria's Burna Boy to perform their hit "Own It." Burna Boy got his own moment and performed an energetic rendition of his African Giant favorite "Anybody."

The night was closed off with a powerful message that read: "A lot of time they tell us 'Black people, we too loud.' Know what I'm sayin'? We need to turn it down a little bit. We seem too arrogant. We a little too much for them to handle. Black is beautiful man." The message flashed on a black screen before a moving performance of "Rainfall" backed by his posse.

Watch the full performance below.

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The ornate gilded copper headgear, which features images of Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, was unearthed after refugee-turned-Dutch-citizen Sirak Asfaw contacted Dutch 'art detective' Arthur Brand. (Photo by Jan HENNOP/AFP) (Photo by JAN HENNOP/AFP via Getty Images)

A Stolen 18th Century Ethiopian Crown Has Been Returned from The Netherlands

The crown had been hidden in a Dutch apartment for 20 years.

In one of the latest developments around art repatriation, a stolen 18th century Ethiopian crown that was discovered decades ago in the Netherlands, has been sent back home.

Sirak Asfaw, an Ethiopian who fled to The Netherlands in the '70s, first found the relic in the suitcase of a visitor in 1998, reports BBC Africa. He reportedly protected the item for two decades, before informing Dutch "art crime investigator" Arthur Brand and authorities about his discovery last year.

The crown is one of only 20 in existence and features intricate Biblical depictions of Jesus, God and the Holy Spirit. Historians believe it was given to the church by the warlord Welde Sellase several centuries ago.

Read: Bringing African Artifacts Home

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