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DJ Fresh, DJ Sbu, Tbo Touch, Gareth Cliff & Robert Marawa Get Real About Working in South African Radio

South African radio royalty discusses the pains and pleasures of the industry.

DJ Fresh, DJ Sbu, Tbo Touch, Gareth Cliff and Robert Marawa are all accomplished radio and TV personalities in South Africa. Recently, they treated radio fans to a conversation among the five of them. The discussion spanned more than an hour and a half, and it focused on the pains and pleasures of working on radio in the country. The legends each gave their takes on various issues such as reshuffling, changing lives with their work, adapting to new trends, radio in the Internet era, and the complicated politics at play.


All five of them have had their fair share of drama and controversy. DJ Fresh was fired by Metro FM for using profanity on air, and recently signed a contract with 947. Phat Joe was pulled off air "until further notice" for homophobic comments he made on his Radio 2000 show last month. TV and radio presenter Robert Marawa, who was let go by Supersport in May, according to him, via SMS, still has a show on Metro FM.

Touch resigned from Metro FM in 2016, and went on to start his own online radio station, Touch Central. DJ Sbu was let go by the SABC in 2015, and went on to start the online station Massiv Metro with Massiv Media. Gareth Cliff currently owns Cliff Central, the online station in which the conversation was being held on the Pure Conversations show. Cliff left 5FM in 2014 to start Cliff Central.

Which is why a conversation among the five personalities was always bound to be a must-listen. They speak about the hard work the goes on behind the scenes, and how those who want to follow in their footsteps should put in the hours just like they did.

The conversation was inspired by a now-viral tweet from comedian Trevor Gumbi, who encouraged the big guns to join forces and start their own radio station. He introduces the episode with his curt sense of humor, poking fun at his counterparts and himself.

Listen to the whole conversation below:

#PureConversations - A few brave broadcasters www.youtube.com


Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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