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South African Jazz Legend Dorothy Masuka Has Died

She was 83 years old.

South African/Zimbabwean veteran jazz musician Dorothy Masuka has been reported death by a number of South African publications.

According to TimesLIVE, Masuka had been suffering from complications related to hypertension after suffering a mild stroke last year.

"She was in the comfort of her home surrounded by her children and grandchildren," family spokesperson Fortune Hute was quoted by the paper as saying.

Masuka's career started blossoming in the 1950s. Just like many artists of her time, her music touched on the injustice black people faced in South Africa during apartheid, among other topics. She found herself in exile in Zambia in the '60s. The exile lasted for 31 years.

The artist was born in Zimbabwe to a Zimbabwean father and South African mother.

Some of her most popular songs include "Hamba Nontsokolo," "MaGumede," "Khawuleza," "Suka Lapha," "Five Bells" and a whole lot more.

Dorothy Masuka - MaGumede www.youtube.com





May her soul rest in peace.

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