Events

OkayAfrica Presents Electrafrique Dakar With DJ Moma, Sabine Blaizin & DJ Cortega!

Electrafrique Dakar returns on January 20 with DJ Moma, Sabine Blaizin and Cortega.

Welcome to 2017, folks! To celebrate the new year, OkayAfrica Electrafrique is back at our new Senegalese home, the gardens of the Maison de la Culture Douta Seck, a green heaven of creativity in the heart of the Medina, aka Dakar's old city.


For this episode, co-produced with Kaani and Jokkolabs, our resident DJ Cortega welcomes two Brooklyn-based family members in Sabine Blaizin and DJ Moma, who have already made their mark on the Dakar scene.

Back in November of 2013, Sabine came through as part of Boddhi Satva's Offering Got Soul Weekender, which also drew afro-house heavyweights Zepherin Saint (London) and Jojo Flores (Canada) to Dakar. Moma was here last year at the same period with us bringing fire to the dance floors at both the Cunimb and Les Petites Pierres.

Meet the DJs

Sabine Blaizin comes from Haiti, and her work focuses on African Diasporic music. Brooklyn Mecca and Oyasound are a few of her creative projects. Her Oyasound EP is currently in the works. Sabine worked for Ocha Records label as a Brand Marketing Director/Producer and Bembe NYC Party resident DJ

DJ Moma comes from Sudan. He is the driving force behind the hugely successful Everyday People parties, as well as the Everyday Afrique shows held jointly with Okayafrica Electrafrique, and Everyday People. Moma's style is highly versatile that will take you to every corner of the dance world, from Africa to Jamaica with a strong New York influence.

DJ Cortega is originally from Switzerland, and has been bringing heat to dancefloors across the Continent since he moved to Nairobi 6 years ago. Last year, he took the Electrafrique party West and moved to Dakar, Senegal, where he now resides and keeps pushing pan-African music by all means necessary.

Doors at 10pm. Entrance is free until 11pm and 3000 FCFA thereafter.

More details and RSVP at the Facebook event. Artwork by @kernubia.

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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