Video

Gabonese Producer Engone Endong's Soccer Video For 'HYPIN'

Montreal by way of Gabon producer Engone Endong shares the Côte d'Ivoire-shot video for "HYPIN," a track from 'Colored Dust (lite)' LP.


Montreal by way of Gabon producer/beatmaker/remixer/selector Engone Endong shares the music video for "HYPIN," a track from his 2011 instrumental album Colored Dust (lite), which he released under the Atsie Sun Orchestra moniker. The visuals, which were filmed by Gabon-based visual artist/photographer Magssi in Côte d'Ivoire, show children playfully practicing their soccer skills under hovering trees to the tune of Edong's jubilant guitar samples and frenetic drums. The clip pans across waterside picnickers and walkers before a halt around the 2-minute mark, the celebratory sounds rendered gravely industrial with the emergence of dying whirs and failing engines. After fading to black, the video returns with the soccer players gracefully kicking the ball in silence, away from the world.

Endong's Colored Dust (lite) enabled him to play alongside DJ Rich Medina and perform at such French-Canadian festivals as Piknic Electronik and Pop Montreal. The producer also scored Yanick Letourneau's The United States of Africa documentary. In addition to being a monthly performer at the Montreal venue Club Balattou, Endong is currently working on a forthcoming EP that, as he tells us via e-mail, will be a "modern instrumental journey through African rites and tradition." In the meantime, watch the music video for "HYPIN" below and check out Endong's latest single "water," a reprise of Ghanaian highlife legend K. Frimpong's "Ensuo Ayari Me."

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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