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Gabonese Producer Engone Endong's Soccer Video For 'HYPIN'

Montreal by way of Gabon producer Engone Endong shares the Côte d'Ivoire-shot video for "HYPIN," a track from 'Colored Dust (lite)' LP.


Montreal by way of Gabon producer/beatmaker/remixer/selector Engone Endong shares the music video for "HYPIN," a track from his 2011 instrumental album Colored Dust (lite), which he released under the Atsie Sun Orchestra moniker. The visuals, which were filmed by Gabon-based visual artist/photographer Magssi in Côte d'Ivoire, show children playfully practicing their soccer skills under hovering trees to the tune of Edong's jubilant guitar samples and frenetic drums. The clip pans across waterside picnickers and walkers before a halt around the 2-minute mark, the celebratory sounds rendered gravely industrial with the emergence of dying whirs and failing engines. After fading to black, the video returns with the soccer players gracefully kicking the ball in silence, away from the world.

Endong's Colored Dust (lite) enabled him to play alongside DJ Rich Medina and perform at such French-Canadian festivals as Piknic Electronik and Pop Montreal. The producer also scored Yanick Letourneau's The United States of Africa documentary. In addition to being a monthly performer at the Montreal venue Club Balattou, Endong is currently working on a forthcoming EP that, as he tells us via e-mail, will be a "modern instrumental journey through African rites and tradition." In the meantime, watch the music video for "HYPIN" below and check out Endong's latest single "water," a reprise of Ghanaian highlife legend K. Frimpong's "Ensuo Ayari Me."

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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